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Understanding Advertising and Why You Simply Cannot Do It All

January 31st, 2022

Advertising Your FAA Artist Website

This article aims to address the artist's needs on FAA trying to balance their time between creating their art and selling it.

You simply cannot do it all. Not effectively.

When is enough, enough, and maybe too much? One of the biggest mistakes that I see FAA members doing is advertising with no advertising plan whatsoever. They think all they have to do is post a few times to Facebook or Tweet here and there, and that's it. Or they are out there thinking they have to be on everything. Total market saturation. Neither one is the right way to go.

There are a lot of ways of advertising your FAA artwork. But to do that you first have to understand something about essential advertising.

Advertising on the net is no different than advertising mainstream media. The vehicles you use are different, but the basic concepts are the same. You have to reach the marketplace and prospective buyers with your product in a way that will most likely give you results.

Let's look at the different vehicles we see most often used by successful sellers on FAA. When I first wrote this, Facebook was probably the number one, with Twitter number two. Today there are too many to mention as far as choices. Equate those to traditional adverting vehicles like TV, radio, newspaper, billboards, etc. Put these aside for a minute because for the purpose of this discussion, we are not going to use them to promote your AW on FAA, but we are going to learn from them.

To keep this as simple as possible, let's look at two different methods to adverting.

First, there is Direct Advertising, Target Marketing, or Market Specific. Someone reinvents a new name for it every year or so, but it is still the same thing that it has been for 200 years.

Then you have Institutional Advertising, Generic, Top of the Mind Awareness, and again all the new names people have come with.

I am assuming you have at least a basic understanding of the two different approaches above. Here is a very simple example of each.

If I have a photograph of a cowboy on a horse, I would target the western cowboy, horse market using Twitter, FB Groups, or any other vehicle to identify these people. This is pretty simple stuff. On Twitter, you use the right #Hashtags; on Facebook, you join the right groups. I do not recommend using #Hastags on Facebook. That tags are links, and they do the opposite of what you are trying to do by sending people away from your artwork in much greater numbers than they draw.

Institutional advertising would differ in that I would not necessarily even mention a photograph but would instead just be posting to Facebook or Tweeting "Visit FASGallery.com, see the best artwork on the net." I would be promoting the "institution" FASGallery to everyone, not to a specific photograph and not to a particular market. This goes to Top of the Mind Awareness. Still really boring I know, but stay with me.

With institutional advertising, what you are trying to do is the same thing All-State Insurance has done with "The Good Hands People" or McDonald's with the Golden Arches. It is a form of branding.

All of these things have to be taken into consideration of any advertising plan. But now we have to talk about the meat of that plan. How do you reach the market in a meaningful way that will get you the best results?

When you get ready to actually launch your plan, you simple cannot do it all. Everyone has limits. We are talking non-paid advertising but it still cost something. The currency is time. And you simply cannot be on Facebook, Twitter, and every one of the dozens of platforms out. Not effectively. It is just simply not the best use of you time because the frequency is going to be too thin to really make the impact you need to make. You will not reach the market penetration that you will need to be effective.

This is where we start talking about Vertical Reach and Horizontal Reach, the meat of any plan.

Most people are not in a position to where they can go for total market saturation. They need to focus; limit the number of vehicles you chose to use, and then use them wisely.

Here is an example. If you were advertising on radio, and there were ten radio stations in your market, more the likely you would not have enough money to be on all of them. You would have to choose. If your budget is $1000, you would be much better off running $500 dollars on two stations instead of $100 each on all 10. $100 is simply not enough to achieve decent market penetration. It would be a waste of money.

Vertical vs Horizontal. Vertical: $500 on each of two stations. Horizontal: $100 on each of 10 stations. In this case, your $100 on each of 10 stations simple will not give you the market penetration you need to get any decent results.

We now need to talk about one of the biggest reasons, besides the cost why you cannot effectively do all of the Social Media outlets. With social media, unlike radio, TV, newspaper and other traditional adverting vehicles you have to build your own audience. You actually have to advertise you advertising vehicle. You have to build up your own followers and friends and circles; your audience.

For advertising to work, you have to reach some level of market penetration. You have to be in that market, advertising your gallery, your artwork, often enough to make an impact, to penetrate the market.

Think of it the same way all great speech writers do when they write a speech. To make a point stick in the audience's mind they know they have to repeat that point three times. "Tell'em, tell'em what you told'em and then tell'em again".

Applying what we have known about advertising for 200 years and from leaning what we have from radio and television, 50 tweets a day or posts to Facebook, will be more effective then 5 posts a day on ten different Social Media vehicles. It will also give you more time to create your art because you do not have to manage all of those different outlets. You can actually make fewer posts to a smaller market and have better results and at same time because you are getting better market penetration which will give you better results.

In closing, pick one or two, maybe 3 vehicles, build up a targeted market as best you can and do the best you can to penetrate that market.

I chose three platforms when I started, Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. With Facebook, it is not about your followers, that is way too small of a market. It is about Joining groups that allow selling and making regular posts to build up a following that will hopefully like and share your posts. Likes and shares give you raking on Facebook. Twitter is about getting Retweets and likes, like give you status and retweets widens your reach way beyond the number of flowers you have.

But the bottom line is you have to have an advertising plan, and you have to be committed to it and stick to it. Plan your work and work your plan as the old saying goes.
Best of luck to you!

FAA is the Retailer Not the Individual Sellers

December 14th, 2021

Are we retailers or are we just getting paid for the use of our images? We are not retailers, IMHO.

That I don’t have to find the suppliers, handle the sales and do the fulfillment is the genius of the FAA system and what I love most about it.

I think the more accurate way to look at what we are doing here is we are getting a fee for the use of our images. We are really not selling anything ourselves other than the use of our images. We are giving FAA permission to sell our images on the product we chose to allow them to sell with our images on them and in return, we are getting paid a fee for that use.

We have no say in choosing which specific products we offer the public. We do not actually choose the vendors or the prices so to say we are selling or retailing to me, is a bit of a stretch. Retailing to me means I am buying a product and then turning around and selling it. We are not doing that here.

We are given a choice; do you want to allow us to sell mugs with or images, yes or no? Do you want to allow us to sell pillows, yes or no? But FAA is picking which mugs, which pillows. We have no choice other than yes or no.

We do some advertising that certain products are available but we do not handle any of the purchasing or the actual selling and certainly none of the pricing beyond our own markup, fee or commission or whatever you want to call it.

It bears repeating. Personally that I don’t have to find the suppliers, handle the sales and do the fulfillment is the genius of the FAA system and what I love most about it.

February 4, 2021 Regarding Sales

February 4th, 2021

SITEWIDE DISCOUNTS
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If a discount is active and someone buys one of your products, then your profit is reduced by the discount percentage. If you opt out of the sitewide discounts, then your products won't appear in the search results when a discount is active.

Buyers can still buy your products if they come to your profile page directly and buy them, but the products won't be discounted, and your profit will not be reduced.

Right now, the sitewide discounts that we're running are only running on the main sites (i.e. FAA and Pixels). They don't affect the white-label websites. As we get closer to the holiday season in 2021, we'll start running discounts that do apply to the white-label websites just like we did in 2020. If you opt out of this discount program, then you're opting out of all discounts on the main sites and the white-label sites.

ADVERTISING DISCOUNTS
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If the buyer arrives on FAA or Pixels after clicking on an paid ad that we ran, then the next order that the buyers places within the next 30 days will be attributed to that ad. For all of the products on the order, the artists' profits will be reduced by 50% assuming the artist is participating in this program. If an artist on the order has opted out, then their profit won't be reduced, but we'll also stop running ads on their behalf, as well.

Currently, we're running ads on Facebook, Instagram, and Google Shopping.

If someone clicks on an ad for product from Artist A but ends up buying a product from Artist B, that still counts as an ad sale, and Artist B's profit will be reduced assuming Artist B is opted in.

DISCOUNTS, IN GENERAL
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We finally rolled these out on January 1st. Etsy did something similar last year (https://www.etsy.com/seller-handbook/article/introducing-etsys-risk-free-advertising/729663416588).

It's really this simple. If you're opted in to sitewide discounts, then we'll show your products in our search results when a discount is active, and your profits will be discounted on any sales that occur when the discount is active. If you opt out, then your products won't appear in the search results while a discount is active, and your products won't be discounted on any orders while a discount is active.

The same thing goes for the advertising discounts. If you opt out, then we'll stop running ads on your behalf, and your profits will not longer we discounted when a buyer orders one of your products after clicking on an ad.

Simply opt out if you are confused or do not want to be a part of them. It really is as easy as that and there is nothing else to explain.

------------------
Abbie Shores
Community Mgr, Technical Support Mgr, Fine Art America | Pixels.com

Post Your Work On Facebook

January 3rd, 2021

I have several Facebook groups that I own where everyone is welcome to join and post your images with links to where they can be bought.

Some of them have specific themes like Western (and wildlife), Seascape (and nautical), Vintage Cars, etc, etc. Please adhere to the themes but post your imates in all of the groups that are appropriate.

The two largess, FineArtInAmerica and Buy & Sell Art Any Art Any Artist and/or Buyers are open to any theme. You can post in the Western group and in both of these or any other group the image fits in. The combined membership of these two groups is 20,000 members.

Western Art Buyers & Sellers https://www.facebook.com/groups/1403150156590398/?ref=group_browse

FineArtInAmerica https://www.facebook.com/groups/521753177970410/?ref=group_browse Any kind of image is okay here as long as you are a member of FAA.

Seascape Art Buyers & Sellers https://www.facebook.com/groups/1473698576246013/?ref=group_browse

Buy & Sell Art Any Art Any Artist and/or Buyers https://www.facebook.com/groups/213947672404317/?ref=group_browse

Digital & Abstract Creations https://www.facebook.com/groups/1664007437146334/?ref=group_browse

Handmade Arts & Crafts https://www.facebook.com/groups/1836089343289694/?ref=group_browse
This group is open to all art images and craft items and it is also the place to post the products from FAA or where else you sell.

Vintage Cars & All Other Vehicle Art for Buyers & Sellers https://www.facebook.com/groups/3790171380999786/

I also have an eBay group that only allows eBay listings. eBay Buyers & Sellers https://www.facebook.com/groups/741852785862849/
The is not junk like you see in some of the other eBay groups. No solicitation, no circumventing eBay through the group. No other selling platform.

I see literally hundreds of post in these groups every day. I also the "Insights" that tell me what kind of action each post is receiving in the way of engagements, likes, comments, photo views, clicks and other reactions.

I have been doing this 6-7 years and I can tell you the post that get the best results as far as total engagements are the simples, cleaning posts. The one that just the image, a short description and link to where it can be bought. The post that are full of #Hastags (*which we no longer allow) videos, more than 3-4 pics and a description that reads like a novel are not getting the action people think they are.

For that reason we have strict rules about what will be approved and what will be declined. Please read the About page and/or the rules before you post.

*About #HashtagsIn my experience with 14 groups and viewing tens of thousands of posts they do not do what people think they do. They are not attracting the numbers of people that people think they are. What they are doing is supplying a link that takes people away for the art and away from the group to God only know where. I have clicked on hundreds of these things in people's post. The do send people to some places I don't think people that post them really intended. I have clicked on #Hastags that have taken me hate groups, political ads, and all kinds of scams and other nonsense.

Looking at FAA from the right perspective

November 5th, 2020

I think the average seller, or at least the average selling that is posting in the threads is looking at FAA from the wrong perspective.

I don’t see myself as a retailer. I see myself as having licensed FAA to use my image on whatever products I authorized them to sell.

I don’t feel I am in anyway responsible for anything that goes wrong no matter what the problem is. I am not responsible if the product does not arrive, or the wrong one is shipped or if the stitching is poorly done or any other problems. That is FAA’s problem.

FAA has a 100%, no questions, asked money back guarantee. To my knowledge they honor that guarantee just as it is stated. And yes, even that process can have glitches and errors but it seems that an awful lot of the problems that are brought to the threads in a big panic are not near as bad as stated. Just look at how often we find out that customer service did respond when we are told there was no response.

The thing to remember here is FAA sells thousands and thousands of items including prints and all sorts of consumer items. They are buying these items from many different vendors around the world. There is going to be problems. No one is perfect. That is why FAA has the guaranteed they have.

My own return rate on several thousand items sold is insignificant. Other sellers much larger than me have reported the same thing.

FAA has been steadily growing its business and has been able to attract some very high-profile names in the art business, people that have been licensing their images as both wall art and consumer products for years. Getty Images, Norman Rockwell (Curtis Publishing), Sports Illustrated, Conde Nast, Vanity Fair, The New Yorker and many other iconic brands would not be choosing FAA if the problem was systemic.

As sellers here we can choose what products we what to sell but we really have no say so as to where those products are coming from, at what price they are purchased or what the quality control is. For that we have to trust that FAA is doing the job of choosing wisely when the decide on a vendor.

I can’t help but believe that some of the above-mentioned iconic brands would be here if they were not. I look at my own return rate, the growth of FAA other factors mentioned here and I have that trust or I wouldn’t be here.

I think if sellers would change their perspective and start looking at selling on FAA for what is really happening. Sellers only taking a fee, in effect licensing the use of their images to FAA. Sellers have to realize that they are not personally responsible for ever little (or even major) thing that goes wrong. I think this perspective it would make life a lot easier.

I fully understand the idea that the sellers name is on the art, but that does not make you responsible for the products. I also understand that some do not want their name on a shabby product. No one does. Unfortunately, that comes with the territory once you get into a licensing agreement where you have no control over the products.

The fact is, we are not the retailers. We are not the ones selling the products. We are merely getting a fee for the use of our images. FAA is responsible for everything else.

Sean McDunn FAA owner Transparency In Discussions posted originally in Sep or Oct of 2018

July 11th, 2020

Pull Quote:

"My biggest advice is to spend more time focusing on what you can control (e.g. creating incredible artwork, building your online following, building your e-mail list, developing a marketing strategy, collaborating with other artists and brands, building relationships with local art galleries, paying for online ads, etc.) and less time on what you can't (e.g. the FAA search engine, the FAA homepage, the FAA collections, the FAA newsletters, etc.)"Sean McDunn, owner of FineArtAmerica

The Full Article

I haven't been in the discussions in a very long time, but Abbie keeps me up-to-date each week regarding important questions that get posted, bugs that get identified, etc.

Last week, we made a small change to our search engine, and like clockwork, the inevitable "sky is falling" post got started about how FAA is terrible... the change to the search engine is killing sales... FAA only cares about big sellers... FAA is lying to everyone... FAA is on the decline... FAA is turning in Walmart... etc.

https://fineartamerica.com/showmessages.php?messageid=4278552

Those sort of posts have occurred after every single website change going all the way back to 2006.

In the past, I used to come in and explain why we're doing what we're doing, but as you all know (as active forum participants), it's almost impossible to change anyone's opinion via a back-and-forth on the internet. The discussions always go nowhere. If you think that a change is bad for you for some reason, no amount of explaining will change your mind. Sales might go up by 20% this year on FAA, but if your sales go down by 10%, then FAA is terrible in your mind.

So - for years, instead of engaging in all sorts of discussions that went nowhere, I just let people continue to post inaccurate statements and wild theories that would go unchallenged. This weekend, however, as I read through some of the advice that was being dispensed here in the forum by certain artists and the statements that were being treated as fact, I started to feel bad for the artists who are here to learn.

When a "sky is falling" post gets started, there is a lot of bad information that gets thrown around as if it's fact, and that's got to be very discouraging and confusing to the artists who are here to learn.

So - we're going to do something about it.

In this post, I'm going to correct some of the wildly inaccurate statements that have been posted in the forum over the past few years and also discuss a new feature that we're releasing which will help you distinguish fact from fiction.

I've written every single line of code that runs this business... have access to every data point regarding every single sale... and am the person making every major decision from high-level strategic partnerships all the way done to graphic design changes on the homepage. After reading through everything below, if your reaction is to say that I don't know what I'm talking about, then there's nothing that I can do to convince you otherwise. That's just the nature of the internet. No one wants to change their mind.

So - here we go.

Transparency When Discussing Sales
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There are 500,000+ artists on FAA, but only about 250 participate in the discussions. That is a very small subset of the overall artist population. Unfortunately, none of our Top 50 sellers participate here. That's unfortunate because many of the artists who are here in the forums each day are here seeking sales advice, and ideally, you want to seek advice from someone who is selling successfully on a regular basis.

In my opinion, one of the biggest problems with our discussion forum, in particular, occurs whenever discussions turn to the topic of "sales", and artists start giving advice to other artists.

There is no nice way to put this. There are a lot of artists in the discussion forum who don't make any sales on FAA. In the following discussion about the search engine, for example, there are a total of 20 artists currently participating:

https://fineartamerica.com/showmessages.php?messageid=4278552

Of those 20 artists, there are four who haven't made a single sale in 2018. That means that 20% of the participants who are expressing outrage that a minor change to the search engine has negatively affected their sales actually have no sales, at all, to affect.

Half of the 20 artists have made less than 10 sales, total, in 2018.

Abbie and I are the only two people who know that information because we can see the sales numbers. For everyone else participating in the discussion, it's very difficult to know what to think and whom to listen to.

To compound the issue, there are other artists who routinely dispense sales advice, advertise their own "how to sell art online" books, etc... and never generate any sales, at all, on FAA. I've mentioned this several times over the years. One artist who routinely dispenses advice has only made one sale since 2015.

There is nothing wrong with not selling. After all - many artists are here to learn how to sell. The big issue is when someone who isn't selling is telling you how to sell... or is getting you all worked up by telling you that his/her sales are plummeting when the sales were non-existent to begin with.

In order to address this issue - I've given Abbie the ability to flag certain discussions as "sales discussions". When she flags a discussion as a "sales discussion", our code is going to automatically show the "average monthly sales volume" beneath the headshot for every participant in the discussion.

Here's how the average monthly sales volume is calculated. Our code adds up the total number of items that you've sold in the past twelve months and then divides it by 12. The average will look something like this:

"8 Sales / Month"

It's not a financial disclosure (i.e. a dollar amount). It's just a count of how many products you sell, on average, in a given month. Note - it does not count products that you purchase for yourself.

If Abbie flags a discussion as a "sales discussion", the sales numbers will only be displayed for posts that occur after Abbie changes it to a sales discussion. Also - before you post, you'll see a big warning telling you that you're about to disclose your sales numbers so that you don't disclose the number by accident.

If you have any questions, let me or Abbie know.


Myths 2018
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Now, I'm going to address a few of the statements that seem to get tossed around as facts in all of these "sky is falling" posts each year.


Myth #1: FAA doesn't promote our artists.
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If you're reading this, you're probably an artist. As a result, you're on our artist e-mail list, and you get artist-related e-mails.

You don't get the buyer e-mails.

If you're on our buyer e-mail list, then you'll see that we're promoting individual artists, groups of artists, and themed collections all the time. Take a look at some of these buyer e-mails:

https://fineartamerica.com/newsletters/soosh-2018.html
https://fineartamerica.com/newsletters/curated-collections.html
https://fineartamerica.com/newsletters/maps-2018.html
https://fineartamerica.com/newsletters/modern-master-christian-jackson-2018.html
https://fineartamerica.com/newsletters/modern-master-aaron-blaise-2018.html
https://fineartamerica.com/newsletters/artist-profile-don-mennig.html
etc...

A new e-mail goes out to the buyers on our e-mail list two times every single week.

We pay to run ads for our featured artists on Facebook, Instagram, and Google.

We pay to load our products onto Amazon and get them featured there.

We hand-select artists to appear on our homepage:
https://fineartamerica.com/

We hand-select artists to appear in our curated collections:
https://fineartamerica.com/collectiongroups

We hand-select artists to appear on our Featured Artist pages:
https://fineartamerica.com/overview/artists

We publish comprehensive success stories about our featured artists:
https://fineartamerica.com/landing/soosh.html

We feature new artists on our social media accounts each day.

etc...

I've always let the myth that we "don't promote our artists" exist because it stops artists from constantly asking us to promote them. With 500,000+ artists, that's impossible. That's why we always tell you that you have to promote yourself - which is definitely true. However, if you think that we don't promote our best-sellers and heavily feature artists that we think are up-and-coming, that's crazy.

We're the largest art site in the world, and we advertise and promote like crazy.

You have to leave the confines of the discussion forum, contests, and groups, and when you do, you'll see that certain artists are heavily featured throughout the site. We're constantly adding new artists to the mix, as well.

If you want to become a featured artist, the easiest way to get on our radar is to A) generate some sales on your own... B) drive a lot of traffic to your images via your own newsletters and social media... C) get yourself mentioned in an art-related publication / blog... or D) be nice and helpful to other artists on the site.

A and B are self-explantory. If you generate some sales or traffic on FAA, we have algorithms in place that will immediately bring you to the attention of someone on our staff. Also - think of it this way. Every time you make a sale, someone at FAA has to, at the very least, review your images for quality, cropping, etc. You've immediately brought your image and your entire portfolio to our attention, and the person reviewing your image has the ability and the authority to promote your images throughout the site.

I wrote a very lengthy article about kickstarting your sales many, many, many years ago. Here it is:

https://fineartamerica.com/why-every-artist-and-photographer-in-the-world-should-be-selling-on-fineartamerica.html

I'm sure that a lot of links in the article are out-dated, but you get the idea.

The one thing that I can guarantee doesn't help you become a featured artist is constantly being a thorn in Abbie's side, causing trouble for her in the discussion forum, and complaining endlessly about how terrible and unfair the website is to you.

Every month, our staff works with a select group of new and existing artists to promote them both online and in the real world.

Here are two of the many artists that we worked with just last month, alone:

https://fineartamerica.com/videos.html?videotype=artMyWay

Our staff spent days getting to know both artists... interviewing them... taking them out to lunches... editing videos for Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube... coordinating social media posts... writing press releases... and ultimately paying to drive hundreds of thousands of viewers to the final videos on Facebook and Instagram.

Those sort of personal interactions happen between our staff and our featured artists all the time, and we chose to work with artists who have great artwork and are fun to work with.

Focus on A, B, C, and D, and maybe you'll be featured some day. There are absolutely no guarantees, and that's why we tell everyone that you have to promote yourself in order to be successful. However, if you generate some sales on your own or otherwise bring attention to your artwork through visitors or the media, we'll definitely notice. That's the way all online marketplaces work.


Myth #2: FAA doesn't advertise.
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This one is always amusing whenever I see someone write it.

FAA spends hundreds of thousands of dollars on advertising each year. We advertise on Google, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and Amazon. Take a look at Google Shopping, for example, and search for "fineartamerica.com".

There are millions of FAA products loaded in there. Visit FAA in an "incognito mode" in your browser, and once you leave the site, you'll find yourself seeing FAA ads everywhere that you go online (e.g. on your favorite news site, on Facebook, on YouTube, on the blogs that you read, etc.).

What is "incognito mode"? It hides the cookies from your browser and makes you appear to FAA like a first-time visitor. We run re-targeting ads constantly to first-time visitors. Guess who we don't run ads to? Artists. Once you login to FAA as an artist, we drop a cookie in our browser which tells us that you're an artist, and then you'll almost never see an FAA ad anywhere online. It's a waste of money to run ads at artists when we should be spending our money going after buyers.


Myth #3: The sky is falling.
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As an individual artist, your sales are going to fluctuate from month-to-month. As the owner of the company, I can see the sales numbers for every single artist on the site, and I have 12 years worth of sales data at my fingertips. Sales go up and down for individual artists. That's just the nature of the business. You might earn $2,500 one month and then $100 the next. It happens to our best sellers, and it happens to our newest, smallest sellers.

If you're actively marketing yourself, the fluctuations will be smaller, but they'll still be there. One month, one of our wholesale buyers might purchase 10 large prints from you for use in a hotel project, and then the next month, they'll buy zero.

That's going to create a big fluctuation in your sales, and that's completely normal.

When your sales fluctuate, the sky isn't falling.

Too often, a few artists will post in the discussion forum that they had a down month, and all of the sudden, the sky is falling for everyone. It's not.

FAA has been growing non-stop for 12 straight years. We're the largest online art site in the world. We're powering the online sales for 500,000+ independent artists and an ever-expanding list of global brands.

If you want to read about the current state of FAA and the print-on-demand industry, in general, take a look at this article:

https://medium.com/@broihier/lessons-from-a-decade-in-e-commerce-bootstrapping-the-worlds-largest-art-site-6c51d42d117d


Summary
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My biggest advice is to spend more time focusing on what you can control (e.g. creating incredible artwork, building your online following, building your e-mail list, developing a marketing strategy, collaborating with other artists and brands, building relationships with local art galleries, paying for online ads, etc.) and less time on what you can't (e.g. the FAA search engine, the FAA homepage, the FAA collections, the FAA newsletters, etc.)

If your sales strategy is to upload images to FAA and then sit back and wait for sales to come in, you'll never be happy. I must have written that sentence at least 50 times over the years. If you're in the business of selling art, then you have to treat it like a business and do all of the things that I mentioned, above. You can't just sit back and wait for sales to roll in.

You've probably heard me use the following analogy many times before:

Let's say that you're a musician and that you upload your songs to Apple Music. After a few months with very few sales / streams, you mention to all of your friends that you're not earning any money as a musician, and the reason you're not earning any money is because Apple Music isn't featuring your songs.

Your friends will look at you like you're crazy. They'll ask you if you're playing bars, restaurants, and open mic nights in order to promote yourself and build some buzz. They'll ask you if you're going out on tour to play small festivals. They'll ask you if you've reached out to radio stations and promoters to try to get your songs promoted. They'll ask you if you've reached out to Apple Music, directly, to try to get in touch with their playlist curators.

Everyone knows that music is a business and that musicians need to hustle in order to get their music heard. Musicians know that, and their friends know that. If you just create songs and upload them, it's almost guaranteed that you won't be successful.

It's no different with art. Selling art is a business. You've taken the first step by adding your art to the world's largest marketplace. The next step is to stand out from the crowd, and that takes a lot of hard work. If you do manage to stand out from the crowd... and you're the type of person that people want to work with... then lots of doors will open up for you.

Every artist should have at least three pricing points

July 10th, 2020

Every artist should have at least three pricing points: Distributor, Wholesale and Retail.

When you go to a gallery you consign it at wholesale. They ask retail, that is normally 50%.

The last thing you want to do is undercut your gallery. Gallery owners in the same areas talk. They share experiences.

A $500 piece, original or print is going to sell out of the gallery for $1000. You can not have it all over the web asking $500 for it. Most gallery owners will not allow it. That makes them look bad. But worse than that it makes you look bad. If you sell many pieces at all, sooner or later one of these buyers is going to find your stuff at $500 and they are going to be mad at both the gallery and you.

The distributor price is for the occasion where someone wants to buy more than one piece, some kind of volume. For a higher volume buyer that price is going to be 50/50 or 50 less 50. Meaning a $1000 retail piece is going to go to that distributor for $250. But again, he has to buy volume. What that volume is for you to decide.

There are eight or ten galleries in the local area here where I stop in and visit all the time. I have high-priced, limited edition prints on consignment at one of them. Some of them will not take local artist any longer at all or only in rare instances because they got tired of seeing local artist selling for half price on the Internet.

This is also a big reason why a lot of galleries are going to all Gicles from large publishing houses where the artist understand the business.

Groups and Contests Are They Worth The Effort?

June 20th, 2020

I do not think entering groups and/or contests, in and of itself, is going to lead to direct sales to any significant level vs using that same time to advertise outside FAA.

There is always going to be someone come along and say they made sales from a contest or from groups and yeah, I get that. I am not saying there are NO sales from groups, I am saying compared to the same effort spent outside FAA that effort is gong to give you a lot better results.

I joined about 200 groups and entered dozens and dozens of contests in the first 2-3 years I was here. I tracked the sales the best I could. I failed to make any direct connection between groups and/or contests and sales. When I stopped doing groups and contests I did not see even the slightest dip in sales. Not even the featured art or contest winners or places saw any sales that I could relate to those groups or contests.

After a year or two of not belong to any group I came up and a marketing plan using groups to promote outside FAA.

I joined 50 groups or so and I posted to them only when I did new uploads. I posted the same image to as many of the groups where the image was appropriate. As soon as I had three or four images with two or three features each I would put together an album on Facebook and promote the album as these images have received special recognition at FineArtAmerican, home of 500,000 of the world's greatest artists. Or wording similar.

I think the same thing could be done with entering the contest and winning or placing in the top three of the contest.

I suggest that joining groups and developing a marketing program around them is the way to go. Just joining groups and thinking that alone is a marketing program, IMHO is not worth the effort.

Pricing Your Artwork - What To Do, What To Do

June 9th, 2020

Pricing Your Artwork - What To Do, What To Do by Arnold White

Do you know the value of your work and how to price it? Probably not.

As a publisher, distributor and consultant in the art world, I have personally reviewed the work of thousands of artists over the last 30 years. In all of that time only a handful were able to say, "yes" to that question.

Pricing art is actually not that difficult. It is basically no different than pricing any other product. The problem with artists pricing their own work is that they generally don't view their work with the same eyes that other businesses do. This is because they are emotionally tied to their product.

Let me make it simple and easy. First, you have cost of materials. Second you have cost of labor.

Such items as paint, brushes, canvas, and other supplies becomes your cost of materials. The cost of labor is the actual time spent in creating your image (product). Determine a value for your time $25.00 - $100.00 per hour. Add the cost of materials to the value of your time and you have a starting price.

What you can do next is to take that price and check comparable work. Comparables are works similar to yours in size, style or subject. You obtain comparables by going to actual or online galleries, trade shows, fairs or festivals.

An interesting exercise would be to apply this to previously established pricing for your work, and compare it to the formula provided above.

What should an artist do about "Wholesale vs. Retail"?

First of all it is important that you fully understand the difference. As the manufacturer of your product, you are the one who needs to establish both retail and a wholesale price for your art.

The retail price is the asking price to consumers or collectors, the person purchasing your work to hang in his/her home or office. The wholesale price is the lowest price for which you are willing to sell your product to a gallery or other retail entity. Usually the difference between the retail and the wholesale is 50%. So, if your retail price is $3,500.00 your wholesale price will be $1,750.00.

It is always better to price your work higher than lower. It is easier to start high and go down than vice versa.

When selling your work directly to a collector or consumer, it is essential to protect the integrity of the retail price. Otherwise, you will be in direct competition with your gallery affiliations. If you are still having difficulty with the pricing of your art, art agents or consultants can be of great assistance to an artist struggling with the pricing and marketing aspect of the art world.

Remember that every year the cost of living increases and so should the price of your art. A good rule of thumb is to have a yearly increase of between 5 and 10%.

Finally, the second rule of thumb is to try and maintain objectivity and to apply the formula. It's only natural that artists have emotional ties to their work, but emotions can cloud their vision and dilute their business judgment.

Arnold White has been a publisher and distributor of fine art prints for over 40 years. He is retired now from the firm he founded that assisted artists seeking to enter the print market.

Work Smarter Not Harder To Beat The Big Guys

December 28th, 2019

Work Smarter Not Harder To Beat The Big Guys

So, you have X number of images, every one of them is very desirable and very sellable.

You have accumulated a significant number of features, likes, comments, followers, and favorites. You have joined dozens of groups and entered all the contests you can. However you still only have a few numbers of views and very few, if any, sales in the time that you have been here. So what are you doing wrong?

You are working hard at all the wrong things, IMHO.

The way FAA was set up in the beginning, all of those things meant something. There was no really famous or well-known artist here at that time. There were no large galleries and there was a mere fraction of the number of members and images. If you had good art and you worked the system and did some outside marketing, you were able to work your way up in the FAA search.

That is how most of the people that are selling and posting in the treads got to where they are in the search and because they are still collecting likes and favorites and features and etc, etc. they are still fairly high up in the rankings. In effect, these people have a giant lead on the rest of us that just got here the last year or two. Their 'leg up' or head start in the search ranking is contributing a great deal to their success. And that means sales and that puts them even higher in the search ranking. There is no doubt in my mind that if they had to start from scratch today, most if not all of them would be struggling just like everyone else because none of these people posting, are famous or have much if any following outside of FAA.

So how is a person to catch up? There are thousands of large sellers that have thousands of likes, favorites, comments, etc. And they are still collecting them. And they are collecting them at a significantly faster rate than you or I or any of the new people. The fact of the matter is you can't catch up. In fact, some of the people that were once much larger sellers are slipping big time in the rankings and sales. You see them saying that in the treads all the time. But they are also still trying to do it the same way they did it before. And it is not working for them. They admit that themselves in the dozens of threads they keep opening. And it is not ever going to work for them the same way it once did.

Does that mean we should all give up? No, not at all. But we must work smarter not harder.

We have to accept the fact that we cannot like, favorite, feature and all of that other traditional stuff to any significant rankings in the search. But we can sell our way in because sales have a much, much greater weighting in the rankings than all of that other stuff.

Now that seems like a chicken or the egg situation, right? Not at all. And that is why I keep hammering and hammering to get outside of FAA and promote your work and ONLY your ArtistsWebsite. Forget or at least minimize your time working on the likes and favorites and thing. It is simply not the best use of your time.

You need to reach outside of FAA and get your work seen by tens of thousands or millions of people. You need to advertise specific pieces and you need to make sure the links come back to those pieces in your ArtistsWebsite, not to your space in the main FAA site. When you link to the main site, you are exposing your hard-earned, prospective buyer to over 200,00 members and over 7,000,000 images with just one click away.

I know this works. I have been a regular seller here from the first day I started doing uploads. I recognized the problem with trying to win the battle for search ranking very early on and I decided I was not going to play that game. My sales have pretty much gone up month over month for each month I have been here. I did it by working smarter not harder. I have been able to gain first-page ranking on several specific images. I see it as no small coincidence at all that they are some of the images that I have advertised the most.

I am not saying to totally ignore the search, keywording, and descriptions. Anyone has at least a small chance of someone paging deep enough through several pages of results that each search returns and being found. I think everyone should do the best job they can on keywording and descriptions but then let the search take care of itself.

Now that said, I am not anywhere near as large a seller as the big guys, not anywhere close. That is not my goal. My goal is to make regular sales day in and day out. And I am doing that. I am doing that by spending time adverting and promoting outside FAA. I don't pay any attention to trying to gain search ranking with any other method other than selling through that advertising. I don't chase that other thing, enter groups or contests or likes and comments.

I have been selling art prints and originals for over 40 years. I was selling prints online before FAA or Amazon or even before eBay or any of the others. I have made a great deal of money selling what I guess maybe as many as 2 or 3 million prints over the years. So I think I know a little about selling prints and the art market in general.

Caution using Discount Codes

December 5th, 2019

You have to be careful with those Discount Codes.

The discount you offer is figured on and paid out of the fee (your markup) you get from FAA on a sale. FAA still sells the product for their full price less your discount. In the example below your 25%, discount would net out as a 6.35% discount.

So, if you offer a 25% discount on a $200 product the customer is not going to be able to buy it for $150.

If your fee is $50, they will get 25% ($12.50) off that $50 so the price they pay will be $187.50.

You have to be able to explain that to your shoppers and prospective buyers or it will confuse them and maybe even annoy some enough to shop somewhere else.

This does not apply to the sales that FAA runs. Only the Discount Codes.

Hashtags In Facebook Groups Not A Fan

November 10th, 2019

I want to mention some thoughts on using #Hashtags in FB groups.

I personally don't use them at all and I do not recommend them.

Yes, you may get a hit or two because of the #Hashtag coming up in the search, but the other thing it does is it shows people the door when they are already sitting there looking at your post. It gives them the choice of going to your image where it can be bought or to any number of places, none of which are places where the artist can make a sale.

Here is a case in point. I don't mean to embarrass anyone but here is a recent post in a FB group with ten #hashtags.

#totebags #giftideas #shopsmall #naturelovers #butterflies #artforsale #environmentallyfriendly #nomoreplasticbags #christmasgifts #washable

When I click on the first one, #totebags, it takes me to a list of four stores where tote bags are sold. NONE of them are selling tote bags for the artist that made the post and none of them are FAA sellers. In fact, one of them is featuring a tote bag where a cat if flipping people the finger.

When I click on the #shopsmall, it takes me to a whole list of shopping malls on Facebook, not of them FAA stores.

My idea of posting in the FineArtAmerica group I started was to help promote FAA artists and to keep the shopper in the group as long as possible hoping they find something for one of us that they want to buy. Or the click on something from one of us and they end up in FAA or Pixels and find something to buy.

I am not really thrilled about sending people to stores and sellers outside of the FAA family.

Marketing on the Cheap Write Right

November 28th, 2018

Marketing on the Cheap Write Right

I wrote a series of Marketing on the Cheap articles and they are still out there around the net. If you search Google for Marketing on the Cheap by Floyd Snyder you should find most of them. These were original articles that I wrote for Strictly Business Magazine, a monthly publication I use to own. This was written in 2002 I think so it is a bit time dated and you need to keep that in mind. But the concept is still valid. At one time I had several hundred or a thousand articles on what was then the four major article circulation sites. All of these articles had been picked up and reprinted on any number of websites. I used to be a major player in the Day Trading craze that swept the nation a few years back and I have tried to remove most of those articles because I get tired of being asked for stock tips. lol

Marketing on the Cheap: Write? Right!!

We all know the value of writing articles for promoting your website or online store. However, writing articles to promote your old-fashioned, traditional brick and mortar business has been around forever.

Contact your local newspapers, and chances are, depending on what business you are in, they may be interested in giving you your own column. Most small or medium-sized media markets will have at least one daily serving the communities and probably at least one weekly newspaper. Offer to supply a weekly or even a monthly column for free. They are always looking for editorial content and "free" is always attractive. Be careful about a daily commitment, this can get overly demanding in a hurry.

It may be a little more difficult to approach the Los Angeles Times or the New York Times, but in major media markets, there is any number of regional weeklies that can be approached.

Other considerations may be regional or even national trade publications, Chamber of Commerce newsletter or other professional associations and organizations you may belong to.

If you can't get the column for free, don't be afraid to pay for it. But make sure the layout is designed to look as much as possible like a regular story or editorial content. The paper will probably require that you put some sort of disclaimer on your column like the word "advertising", but this is not a big deal.
Have a professional photo taken and include it in your articles whenever possible. Don't use your high school photo or one that is touched up to make you look totally different than you actually do. You are trying to build recognition and credibility. After your column has run for some time, you will be surprised how many people will easily recognize you. People like to do business with people they know.

Okay, so now you have own column; make good use of it. Give it value. Do not make it a blatant advertisement and/or sales pitch. In fact, except on extremely rare occasions, you probably don't want to sell anything directly in your column at all. You want to write real content, stories that are either of real value or entertaining. I had a friend once that owned a restaurant. He paid to have his own column in our local newspaper. He never once wrote a story about his own restaurant. Instead, he wrote about his world travels, famous chefs, and the wonderful restaurants he had enjoyed.

Another approach you may want to consider is a "How To" column. I once supplied a weekly column for an art gallery/picture-framing studio. We wrote a series of how to buy and frame your own artwork.

Check your local newspaper and you will no doubt see examples. If you are writing the column for the newspaper and not paying for it, make sure you retain editorial control and copyright to the work. If you are paying for insertion, ask your ad representative or ad agency for samples. As you travel around, pick up the local newspapers in the area you are visiting and see what others are doing.

If you don't have the time or the feel you are not capable of writing your own column, check with an ad agency. You should be able to find one that provides this service. If you belong to a professional association, check with them and see if they supply "ghost" stories. I have worked with accountants, stockbrokers, lawyers, and others using ghost stories.

I will suggest that if you are not writing the story yourself, you may want to avoid the byline that says "by" and use "furnished by" or "supplied by" or something of that nature. The last thing you want to do is get caught taking credit for writing something someone else wrote. If you pay a copywriter for the original copy, this is not as likely to happen. But if you use ghost stories from an association, you are more then likely not going to have exclusivity. Someone in another publication may be running the same story.

When you start this project, think long term. It takes a commitment. It will take some time to build readership. You are establishing yourself as an expert in your field to people that don't know you. This will not happen overnight.

I mentioned retaining editorial control and copyright. After you have created a number of columns and/or stories, you may want to consider putting them all together in a book. Keep this in mind in the early stages. If you are working with a ghostwriter or ad agency, make sure they understand your intentions so proper preparations can be made and taken into consideration from the very beginning. If your traditional non-web based business does have a website, and it should have, make sure you prepare your writings for distribution on the net as well.
Once you start writing you can use the materials in any number of different ways.

So go write something!

Whats It Worth

September 26th, 2018

September 5, 2008

What's It Worth?

We get a lot of request from many very nice people hoping we can shed some light on the value of a piece of artwork they already own. Unfortunately, as much as we would like to, we are not able to respond individually to these request. One of the reasons is, there is just way to many of them. Besides that, we are not art appraiser nor do we deal in the secondary art market. But even if we were, it would still be irresponsible of us to try to put a price on a piece of artwork that we have never seen.

Hopefully the following will be some assistance to you.

For the most part you can probably find some indication as to value by searching the Internet, including eBay, and see if you can find someone trying to sell an exact or similar piece.

You may try taking your piece to a local gallery, picture framer or art historian. Try contacting the art department of a local university or even a junior college in your community.

Another source may be your local art association. They may be able to direct you to someone in your community that can help you.
You may also what to consider a professional art appraiser. However, I suggest you do that only after you have convinced yourself there is indeed real value here. Art appraiser fees can be substantial.

Check with local galleries for the name of an appraiser. If they cannot help you, try your own attorney, especially attorneys that deal in estate and or divorce law. They very often have appraisers they use and may share a source with you.

I also want to mention the Framehouse Gallery connection or lack thereof. Back in the 1970's and 80's they were a well know publishing house that represented a number of very well know artist including some whose work we handle; Snidow, Frace, and Gordon to name a few. However, that company went out of business some 120-25 years ago. We are not associated in any way with that company and never have been.

Good luck in you research and we hope we have been of some assistance.

Floyd Snyder
FASGallery
FrameHouseGallery

Branding On This Level is Way Overrated Not Likely to Happen

April 19th, 2018


"I thought that since Canon is a brand name, all their gear had to be good, right? Wrong!!! I had a whole bag full of lenses covering every possible situation, but they were very poor quality. '

Yup, branding is way overemphasized here, IMHO. There is really very little in the way of actual branding going on here in the same sense of the term when it applies to Nike or Coke or Ford. What is going on here is more like building a following of loyal buyers and some level of name recognition.

Branding suggests that you have or are going to achieve some kind of top of the mind awareness in the overall marketplace. That is very, very unlikely to happen for the average and even significantly above average seller on FAA.

The other thing that is overemphasized is the idea of having to qualify every FB friend and Twitter follower, often referred to or stated as target marketing. Target marketing is extremely important when you are paying for advertising to reach your market. Especially if you are doing direct mail, traditional or email, and have to pay for each email or mailing piece.

But on SM there is no cost unless you are paying for ads and then you are limited as to what you can choose for your target market.

If you build a list of 2000 or even 5000 qualified buyers, it is my opinion that if you really want to make significant sales and significant money, that is simply too small of a market.

As I have said many times in the past, if I had to choose between 5000 of my hand-picked followers and 2 million people that chose to follow/friend me, I will take the 2 million. I have no doubt that in that 2 million there are going to be a lot more than 5000 qualified art buyers.

But the good news is, you do not have to make that choice. You can and should do both.

Low Cost Social Media Marketing Plan

September 15th, 2017

As many of you know, I come from a 40 year background in both selling art and advertising.

Having been the owner of three brick and mortar art galleries, a publishing company and an ad agency, I am a big believer in traditional advertising. The Internet has changed a lot of the thinking but the basics are still the same. Get the product seen by the largest number of potential buyers as you can. And of course, it goes without saying that it has to be done with a plan that is economically efficient.

Most advertising plans start out with a budget that is usually some percentage of the gross sales. The number most agencies will use is 15% of sales. Simply put that would mean if you do $100,000 in sales, you should be spending $15,000 in advertising. I am not interested in hearing the arguments on rather you agree with this or not. It is long-standing practice that we do not need to discuss here. I am just laying down some very basic principles so you can see what the new plan is based on. And I am not suggesting anyone has to spend $15,000. The budget is going to set itself based on your individual sales.

There are two basic concepts in play here that we are going to actually try to compromise here to keep cost down. That means the overall plan is going to be based on how long it is applied instead of how much money you spend on it in the short term.

First, advertising is all about impressions. Tell'em, tell'em what you told them and then tell'em again. Repetitiveness is crucial for success.

Second, one needs to understand the principal of vertical vs horizontal advertising. For this program we are going to go for the vertical not the horizontal. A simple explanation is that with a limited budget, you need to focus on one (or two at the most) Social Media outlet for your message. If you want to read more on vertical vs horizontal reach, Google it or read my blog Understanding Advertising and Why You Simply Can Not Do It All https://fineartamerica.com/blogs/understanding-advertising-and-why-you-simply-can-not-do-it-all.html

Okay, so there is the basic we are going to apply here.

The program is much simpler then the prelude! :-)

Recently, I have been sharing my sales with a few of the Facebook groups that I started and the largest of the other groups I belong to. Every time I post one of these “Recently Sold” announcements to Facebook I get asked if I want to boots the post. The buy in is at a very low level or pretty much whatever you want it to be.

My idea is that for every sale you make you take from 10% - 20% of the profit you make only on that sale and boost that post for that amount. At the same time, you make sure you share those same posts in as many FB groups as you can and with as many friends that you can.

This will give you an ongoing advertising plan that is easy to keep track of and not break the bank. Part of the thinking is that if the image sells once, it will probably have a higher potential to sell again. I know that is not a 100% so please don't tell me how that is not a for sure thing. I get that.

The other thing I am suggesting is that you make the posts look exactly the same as much as possible. Using the FAA share button from the image page itself is what I strongly recommend. I never use that notification that you get that says something like help Joe spread the word or whatever it says. I only use the one from the image page on my ArtistsWebsite or Premium site.

I suggest you develop some kind of positioning phrase, or signature of some sort. It does not have to be much but it should be unique to you. I sign all of my post with just simply Enjoy! Floyd Snyder, FASGallery.com.

I also mention that the image can be bought on paper, canvas, and on consumer items. I don't really like it all that much because it is too commercial and way to long. So far none of the groups that I posted it to have rejected it so the group administrators do not seem to mind.

I just recently did this for an image I sold and as soon as I launched the "boost" I did make a sale of the same image. Absolutely no way in the world to know if it came from a post that the resulted from the boot.

Here is the draw back. This is pretty low dollar, directly related to how much you sell and there is no auto FAA tracking. In order for it to really be tested to where we can see if it is creating any sales, it is going to have to be a medium to long term program and you will have to track your own sales and see if you get repeats on those specific images that you boost. There is no way to tell if you get residuals or not by someone clicking on the boosted ad but buying a different image. But of course over time I would expect that to happen.

You are going to have to be willing to add to the money for boosting if the profit on the sale is very small. Or you can accumulate the money and added it to where ever you decide. I am going to add budget because I want the repetitiveness of people seeing that I am making sales giving them the impression that I have great stuff that people are buying. Some may want to consider adding 15% to your prices if you think they can stand the price increase. That is up to you.

I have several Facebook Groups that I stated to help people get seen on Facebook. You can go to any of those group pages and scroll down and see these posts that I have been making. Here is a link to the blog that has the group names and address. https://fineartamerica.com/blogs/four-facebook-groups-for-faa-and-of-pixels-members-to-consider.html

Feel free to leave a comment below.



It Is Not How Long It Is How Many

June 6th, 2017

How long you have been a member of FAA or how long your image has been on FAA or on the Internet has little to do with selling it or when it will sell.

That it does, is a myth that people have bought into here because it is being put forth by a handful of people, right along with the myth that every image has to be spectacular. It does not. It only has to be seen by the right person.

The idea that an image has to be here or on the Internet for some time before it sells simply lacks any real merit. Now I will agree that the longer the image has been on FAA and/or the Internet, the more people see it and the more apt it is to sell. But that is still dependent on the being seen factor, not the longevity factor.

I started selling the first week I was here and I have been selling daily every since.

It is not how long you have been here of how long your images have been here or on the Internet. It is about how many people see your work.

When a prospective buyer sees one of your images, they don't have any idea how long they been here or on the Internet. Few people bother to look at the counter. No one says, oh, I can't buy this image; the buyer has only been on FAA for a couple months or years. Nor do they say, hey, I am going to go buy from JC because he has been here longer than Floyd.

If you upload an image and in one week 100 people see it, and I put up an image and in that same one week, 10,000 people see it, pretty sure I have a better chance of selling my image then you (now here's the part that most people hate) even if your image is a much, much better image.

The two biggest factors, even more important than the quality of your work are how many people see your images and how many you have. Quality is an issue, but it is not the most important one. That too is a myth.

Some of the images of my own work that I sell here and other places, every month, are images that people here have told me would never sell. But yet, I just keep selling them.

Barbara and Floyd Snyder Art Exhibit at Los Olivos Wine Merchant and Cafe

May 5th, 2017

Barbara and Floyd Snyder  Art Exhibit at Los Olivos Wine Merchant and Cafe

"Peace and Tranquility" by Barbara and Floyd Snyder Art Exhibit at Los Olivos Wine Merchant & Caf

A new show of photographic art by local artists Barbara and Floyd Snyder will be on view at the Los Olivos Cafe from March 2nd through May 4th. This talented married couple has each inspired the other's creative photography over time and their work shows delightfully well together in this exhibit. Each artist works both with original photography and digitally enhanced original photography, largely concentrating on scenes from nature that they feel bring an experience of peace and tranquility to the viewer. The beautiful images on view provide an engaging viewing encounter, and pieces are available for purchase by those who may wish to acquire a work that provides a lyrical commentary on nature's many gifts.

Each artist has worked in very interesting career fields that over time changed and evolved into a concentration on artistic endeavors.

They have owned and operated picture frame studios and art galleries and their backgrounds have informed their art and encouraged them to give attention to their own creativity. They have much to share with those who have the opportunity to view their work.

This exhibit is one of a continuing series of shows made possible by the commitment of the Los Olivos Wine Merchant & Cafe to showcase local art and artists. Santa Ynez Valley Art Association (formerly the Artists Guild SYV), a nonprofit arts organization with over thirty years of history in the area, coordinates and manages the "art without borders" installation in cooperation with the Cafe. A portion of art sales benefits the organization, and these collaborative efforts - a way to keep art alive and accessible in the Santa Ynez Valley.

Catalina Island 22 Miles Across The Sea

February 19th, 2017

Catalina Island 22 Miles Across The Sea

Only 22 miles off the coast of Los Angeles lies one of the most popular tourist destinations of Southern California, Catalina Island. This rocky island that is part of the Channel Island chain, 8 miles wide and 22 miles long, has a very colorful history. The island, originally inhabited by Native Americans known as the Pimugnans, was discovered in 1542 by Portuguese explorer Juan Rodriquez Cabrillo who was sailing for Spain. Though he claimed it for Spain, it remained untouched until 500 years later when it was rediscovered by Sebastian Vizcaino.

During the next two centuries, the island was used for otter and seal hunting even though trading with other countries was forbidden by Spain. Russian traders were among those who frequented the island since there was little enforcement of the prohibition of trading. Because of the many hidden coves and Catalina's close proximity to the mainland, smuggling was a common occurrence in the area. In the 1860's even gold-digging was attempted, which never panned out.

The island remained under the control of Spain and later Mexico until it became a part of California which eventually became a state. In 1846 Governor Pio Pico gave a Spanish land grant of Rancho Santa Catalina to Thomas Robbins. It remained his property until he sold it to Jose Maria Covarrubias in 1853. Covarrubias sold this grant to Albert Packard of Santa Barbara. Packard, in turn, sold the island to James Lick in 1864 who controlled it for the next 23 years. In 1887 George Shatto purchased the island for $200,000 and created the city of Avalon. Shatto was a real estate speculator from Grand Rapids, Michigan and was able to take advantage of the real estate boom of California at the time. In developing Avalon the first hotel on the island and the pier were built. Sadly, Shatto was not able to keep up with his loan. He defaulted on the loan, and the island went back to the Lick Estate.

The Banning Brothers made a valiant attempt to perpetuate the efforts of Shatto and made Avalon a resort community with more development. Unfortunately, a fire burned several hotels and facilities, creating a huge debt for the Banning Brothers that they could not overcome. In addition World War I caused a severe decline in visitors and tourists who had been coming to the island. In 1919 the Bannings had to sell shares in their enterprises due to the downturn in the economy. It was at that time that William Wrigley Jr, of Wrigley chewing gum, enters the picture to purchase shares. He made his move to buy out most of the shareholders which give him controlling interest in the Santa Catalina Island Company.

Under Wrigley's ownership, he endeavored to promote various activities and events that included the completion of the Catalina Casino in 1929. In addition, he brought the Chicago Cubs, also owned by him, to the island for their spring training season starting in 1921. The Cubs continued to call Catalina its spring training home until 1951, with exception of the war years. From 1942 to 1945 the island was closed to tourists because it was being used as a training camp for the military.

When William Wrigley Jr. passed away, his son Philip Wrigley took over the Catalina Island Company and continued to improve the infrastructure projects that his father had started. However, with the outbreak of World War II, the island took on a different role starting with the steamships being taken over to transport troops. The following agencies and entities established themselves in several locations on the island: Avalon was used to house the Maritime Service; Two Harbors became a training area for the army; the interior of the island became a radar station under the Army Signal Corp; Toyon Bay was used for the Office of Strategic Services; and Emerald Bay became the location for underwater demolition training.

In 1975 Philip Wrigley deeded the 42,135 acres of the Santa Catalina Island Company to the Catalina Island Conservancy. Wrigley had assisted in the formation of the conservancy, and with the transfer of land to the Conservancy 90% of the island was under their umbrella. The remaining property remained under the control of the resort property owners. In 2007 a fire in Avalon destroyed several structures, but the assistance from the LA County firefighters, the US Navy, and the US Marine Corp kept the losses to a minimum. After some rebuilding, the tourists continued to flock to the island.

Catalina's mild Mediterranean climate with the low annual precipitation continues to entice visitors year round. A visitor can find several of the 400 plant species that are only found on Catalina Island. Besides plants, there are five native mammals which include the island fox, the California ground squirrel, the Catalina harvest mouse, the Santa Catalina Island deer mouse, and the ornate shrew. In 1924 bison were introduced to the island when a movie company brought them to be a part of a Western movie called The Vanishing American. The bison were left on the island to save money at the completion of the filming, which had run over budget. The bison population has now grown to over 150.

Protecting the cultural and natural heritage is the cornerstone of the private nonprofit Conservancy. Catalina Island is a beach and water lover's paradise with more than a million visitors each year. The variety of activities include scuba diving, snorkeling, swimming, sunbathing, boating, glass bottom boat trips, golf, hiking, sightseeing, and much more. There is just about something for everyone. One fact worthy of note is that motor vehicles are restricted, and most residents and visitors use golf carts and bicycles.

Unfortunately, the Casino no longer operates as a casino. However, on the plus side, the former casino is now a museum that provides a good look at the cultural heritage with more than 100,000 items in the collection. This an ideal way to get a good view of Catalina's past and present. Making a trip in the future is worth the time and won't soon be forgotten.

Visit FASGallery.com to see several images featuring Catalina Island. Search on Catalina.

Are Your Prices Too High?

November 26th, 2016

Ask any top salesman or sales manager and they will tell you that the weaker the salesman is, the more reliant they are on price to make sales. As a sales manager, it is your job to make sure that the weaker salesman is not giving away the house to make is his living. In the case of selling your own work, you are your own sales manager. You need to know how to do that job.

The less you know about selling, advertising, and marketing, the more competitive you have to be in your pricing structure and the harder it is going to be to keep yourself from giving away the house.

We see it here all the time where people are encouraged to raise their prices, raise their prices. I just don't think that that is going to work for everyone. The less the seller knows about marketing, selling, and advertising, the more the art itself has to sell itself. Competitive pricing is going to make it easier for that to happen.

Take two images, both the exact same quality and hold the same appeal to the buyer. The guy that has image A has a great sales pitch, a great story and has caught the imagination of the buyer. He is asking $500 for his image. Seller B has basically the same image with the same level of enthusiasm from the buyer and the same $500 price but his sales pitch, his story is a boring "please by my print". The advantage is going to go to the seller with the better pitch.

Now take the exact same situation but seller B has a $400 price tag compared to seller A's $500. That is going to level the playing field quite a bit.

The more marketing, advertising and selling experience and knowledge you have, the easier it is to support higher prices.

But... the answer is not as easy as just lowering your prices. That may be only part of the answer. The full answer is to go to school and learn as much as you can about marketing, selling, and advertising. Even if you hate it and know you are never going to be good at it. You will learn enough to at least up your game to a higher level and become less dependent on lower prices.

The 25-75 Rule For New Members

November 12th, 2016

How many images you have for sale is important to how many sales you can expect to make.

I would suggest you forget the threads, groups, sponsoring pages, contests, likes, favorites, worrying about the FAA search ranking, views and all of the other stuff too many people get all bogged down in. That is assuming you are more interested in selling than socializing.

You should spend 75% of your time creating and uploading your art and 25% advertising your Artist Website OUTSIDE of FAA. Until you get closer to 250-300 images I would stay that course. Once you get to the 300 images, your goal should be to add images and get the number up as high as possible. There IS a direct relationship to the number of images and number of sales.

That said someone is going to no doubt come in here and tell you about the people that have less than 100 or less 50 that sell every day. And that is true. But they are very, very, very rare and they have special circumstances such as a famous name when they came here, connections with outside organizations that promote their work or some other special circumstances.

I have been here right at 4 years (as of November 2016). I did all of the above and tracked sales and their relationship to all of the things above. I found that there was ZERO relationship to sales and everything else except adding images and outside advertising. That said, I am not one of the top sellers in FAA but I do sell every day for the most part. The top sellers never show up in the threads.

Jump in, get your feet wet and get your Premium up and running. The sooner you get it up, the sooner it will start being indexed by searches OUTSIDE of FAA.

A couple of quick tips.

Keywords are critical but make sure you do not accidentally spam. If it not in the image or directly related to the image, do not put it in the keywords. They will make you redo them if they think they are spam.

Make sure you use good descriptions with as many search terms that you can think of.

Same thing with titles. Example: "Red Rose" okay "Red Rose Mission Santa Barbara" better.

Facebook used right is a very valuable tool. There are others but you mentioned you have a Facebook page. First, forget the idea of Facebook is an avenue of staying in touch with friends and relatives. You have to think outside those old notions of Facebook.

You simply cannot get enough "friends" to make a market for your work. The secret of Facebook is joining groups and getting your posts shared. And NOT groups of only artist. If you sell Christian art, join Christian groups, if you sell florals, join gardening groups. I sell a lot of western art. I belong to all of the western groups where western buffs hang out.

Do not just join and start spamming them with your images. Check out the group and watch what others are posting.

DO NOT put a link or a sales pitch in your posts. Put the links that go back to you to your AW where it is seen ONLY if someone clicks on your image.

Interact with the group. Make comments, make friends, like and share other people's post and they will do that the same for you making for a much broader based reach.

But remember, this is a marathon, not a sprint.

Selling is Not Selling it is Problem Solving

October 29th, 2016

Selling Isn't Selling - its Problem Solving and Filling Needs

You will find six different definitions for the word "selling" if you look the word up in the dictionary. Six. However, not one of them will give you the real meaning of the word you need if you really want to maximize your own or your staff's sales efforts.

So what is selling?

Selling is problem-solving through the fulfilling of someone's needs.

No matter what product or service you are selling, your clients and customers come to you hoping you can solve their problem. Of course, they don't always see it that way themselves, and, all too often, you or your staff fail to recognize it.

If you really want to totally understand the selling process, one of the best ways to do this is to look at it from the buyer's perspective. What problem (need) are they expecting you to solve? Where does it originate? And what are the main motivating factors driving that particular buyer's need?

To do this it would help to have at least a basic understanding of Maslow's "Hierarchy of Needs": Self-Actualization, Esteem, Love, Safety, and Physiological. Maslow writes that all human behavior is motivated by unsatisfied needs that fall into one of these general categories. Therefore, buying is motivated by a need based on one of the above elements of Maslow's Hierarchy.

For our purposes, we can group most, if not all, of your client's needs and Maslow's Hierarchy into two different categories:
Physiological Needs - Basic needs such as air, water, food, sleep, etc. For the most part, these are needs that one cannot live without.
Psychological Needs - Love, esteem, self-recognition, recognition by others, acceptance.

Think about the products you sell and which of Maslow's categories is motivating the need for your product.
For an in-depth understanding, I suggest you Google Maslow's "Hierarchy of Needs" and read more. The theory is not all that complicated and should be "a must read" for anyone making a living from selling.

Selling Benefits not Features.

Okay, so now that you understand that your customer has needs, you have to know how to satisfy them. You satisfy their needs (solve their problems) by giving (selling) them the "benefits" of your product that go directly to solving their problems, not by trying to sell them "features" that have little or no value according to your client's needs.

For example, if you are selling automobiles, and your prospect is a young married couple with rug-rats in tow, you probably don't want to be showing them all the fancy features of that really sleek, 2-door, 2-seater sports car. This feature-ridden beauty may mean a nice fat commission to you if you can get them to go for it. But it probably has zero benefits to the couple if their needs are for a family sedan or mini-van to haul the family around and drive the neighborhood kids to school when it is their week for the car-pool.

Frequently, we see sales people trying to sell something to their customers because if fills more needs of the salesman than the customer. The Bigger commission, old merchandise that needs to be moved, doesn't have the right product or any other number of reasons will motivate a salesperson to try to sell something that fails to solve the problem the customer was hoping to solve. This, all too often, ends up with a dissatisfied customer.

The next time you wait on a customer, think of yourself as a problem solver. Try solving their problems by matching their needs to the product with the best features that give real benefits toward filling their needs. Solve your customer's problems, and it becomes a win/win for both of you.

Remember this and you will close more sales.

Historic Buildings, Everywhere You Look

October 24th, 2016

Historic Buildings, Everywhere You Look

When people think of historic buildings, they mostly think in terms of the White House, the Empire State Building or Independence Hall. But if you just look around as you are traveling, they are really all over the place, almost everywhere you look. Here are a few of my favorites that I found as I wander around the good ol' USA. I hope you enjoy them!


Remnants Of The Grapes Of Wrath John Steinbeck Quote by Barbara Snyder

If you take River Road out of Soledad California and drive across the farm fields towards Carmel, you will see many remnants of the 1940 Steinbeck, Grapes of Wrath era. This old barn above is one of many. Talked to the owner of this property that has been in his family for generations. The building was in much better shape during the depression and when it was not full of produce during the harvest season, they allowed the homeless farm workers to use it for shelter during foul weather conditions. Both his father and grandfather had passed down stories of the Steinbeck era and he was willing to share those stories with any that would listen. I spent about two hours with him and it was very enlightening.


Image Above: Mission Santa Barbara by Barbara Snyder

Mission Santa Barbara, also known as Santa Barbara Mission, is a Spanish mission founded by the Franciscan order near present-day Santa Barbara, California. It was founded by Padre Fermin Lasuen on December 4, 1786, the feast day of Saint Barbara, as the tenth mission for the religious conversion of the indigenous local Chumash-Barbareno tribe of Native American people. The mission is the namesake of the city of Santa Barbara as well as Santa Barbara County. The Mission grounds occupy a rise between the Pacific Ocean and the Santa Ynez Mountains and were consecrated by Father Fermin Lasuen who had taken over the presidency of the California mission chain upon the death of Father Presidente Junipero Serra. Mission Santa Barbara is the only mission to remain under the leadership of the Franciscan Friars since its founding, and today is a parish church of the Archdiocese of Los Angeles.


Pitkin Conrow Victorian Mansion Arroyo Grande California by Barbara Snyder

If haunted houses are your thing, you can visit this beautiful, restored victorian mansion on Valley Road in Arroyo Grande, California. A laughing ghost by the name of Alice is said to occupy the tower room. She also loves cats and also plays with her young male friend that also lives in the mansion. If you want to read more about this historic treasure and the ghosts that haunt it, click on the click to purchase link. No purchase necessary just to read the story.


Pauls Place by Barbara Snyder

Paul's Place is located just off Highway 176 in Waldon California just east of Lake Isabella in Kern County California. It has been a family run business for over 75 years.This particular building is of significant historic interest because it once served as the shower and bathing house for dam workers during construction. You can click the purchase link above for more details, no purchase necessary.


Creek Street Ketchikan Alaska by Barbara Snyder

Creek Street is a historic area of Ketchikan, Alaska. The street is actually a boardwalk mounted in stilts on a high slope on the east side of Ketchikan Creek, east of the city's downtown.Creek Street is infamous as being Ketchikan's red light district, roughly between 1903 and 1954, and some of its attractions are commemorations of this past. Its origins lie in a 1903 city ordinance banishing brothels from the city center to the "Indian Town" area on the east side of the creek, and it operated until the brothels were outlawed and shut down in 1954. Numerous houses of prostitution sprang up on this difficult terrain, supported by wooden stilts. Famous among them is The Star, which was one of the largest of these businesses, and Dolly's House, which is now a museum. Winding into the hills above Creek Street is Married Man's Way, a trail used by patrons of the brothels to escape raids. Click the purchase link for more details. No purchase necessary.These are only a few of the hundreds of historic buildings I have photographed over the years. To see more great photography and art from around the world including the Old Masters, visit FASGallery.com. Enjoy!

Pebble Beach, Monterey Peninsula Golf Meca

October 19th, 2016

Pebble Beach, Monterey Peninsula Golf Meca

This is the view (left) of the clubhouse at Pebble Beach Golf Links that golfers see when standing on the tee at the 18th hole looking straight into the back of the clubhouse. Of course, no one plays the hole to cut across the bay. Not on purpose anyway.

This is one of the most famous golf courses in the world and very often tops the lists of Best Courses in the World. It is also the course that most people, worldwide, say they want to play, putting it very high up on a lot of "bucket lists".

Pebble Beach also is the home of one the PGA Tour's most famous, yearly tournaments, the AT&T, Pebble Beach Open and Pro-Am event. The yearly "clam-back" was originally founded and sponsored by the famous crooner of all time, Bing Crosby. Bing, of course, has moved on to greener fairways in a better place bu the legacy continues on as it still draws a star-studded crowd of Hollywood stars and Fortune 500 billionaires.

Bill Murray of Ghost Busters fame is probably the most followed players on the course during the 4-day event were unlike other pro-ams, the celebs actually can qualify to play on and finish with the pros on Sunday.

Pebble Beach is now owned by an organization that includes none other than Carmel By the Sea past mayor and Hollywood giant Clint Eastwood. Clint, now in his 80's no longer plays in the event but he still attends and does live guest commentary on the network broadcast and is usually in the booth for the when the trophy is won.

The 2016 edition of the tour event drew 180,000 spectators and millions of viewers. The event was played on three of the Monterey Peninsulas premier golf courses: Pebble Beach Golf Links, Spyglass Hill Golf Course, and Monterey Peninsula Country Club Shore.

Monterey Peninsula Foundation is proud to host the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am. In the 2015/16 fiscal year, the Foundation donated $10.8 million to support local nonprofits in Monterey, Santa Cruz, and San Benito Counties.

No Good in a Bed, but Fine Up Against a Wall

October 15th, 2016

No Good in a Bed, but Fine Up Against a Wall

Image Left: Eleanor Roosevelt Roses by Barbara Snyder


Throughout history, a lot of famous people have had flowers named after them. Leonardo da Vinci, Ingrid Bergman, Princes Di, Abraham Lincoln, is just a few of those so honored.

Also included among famous people that have had that honor bestowed upon them is Eleanor Roosevelt. Her rose is called the Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt. Eleanor Roosevelt was the First Lady and wife to President Franklin Delano Roosevelt.

Mrs. Roosevelt was a social activist and very outspoken First Lady that was never one to spare the public or her President husband the benefits of her ideas and opinions. She stayed up to date on current affairs and often spoke out about issues of the day including those that affected the White House.

When she first heard of having a rose named after her she was quite pleased being an active gardener. However, after seeing the write up in a flower catalog of the day, the following quote has been attributed to her:

I once had a rose named after me and I was very flattered. But I was not pleased to read the description in the catalogue: no good in a bed, but fine up against a wall.

Historians have not all agreed that she ever actually utter that phrase but giving the nature of her personality and the sometimes colorful manner in which she expressed herself, most all admit that it was certainly something she was quite capable of saying.

Keep in mind that as a young woman she played field hockey in school and it has been said that she loved to drive race cars.

Another interesting but not well-known fact about the former First Lady, she was the niece of our 26th President, Teddy Roosevelt (1901-1909) and the wife of President Franklin D. Roosevelt (1933-1945). She was the 5th cousin, once removed, to Franklin D. Roosevelt.

Morro Rock of Morro Bay, California

October 15th, 2016

Morro Rock of Morro Bay, California

Image Left: Reflection Anchorage by Barbara Snyder

Morro Rock located in Morro Bay, California is the most famous of the Nine Sisters, a string of extinct volcano peaks, referred to as volcano plugs, that run through San Luis Obispo country. Many construction projects mined the rock itself for use in building the breakwater of Morro Bay and Port San Luis Obispo and the famous Bixby Bridge on well traveled Highway One.

In 1963 the blasting was stopped and in 1966 the title to the rock was transferred to the State of California. Both the City of Morro Bay and the Country of San Luis Obispo have had it declared a California Registered Historical Landmark and it is now a designated bird sanctuary for the Peregrine Falcon and other sea birds.

The rock got its name "El Morro" in 1542 by Portuguese Explorer Juan Rodriquez Cabrillo and it is said to be 23 million years old. The rock stands 576 feet tall and has been a navigational aid for mariners for over 300 years.

It is often referred to as the "Gibraltar of the Pacific" and is the last of the nine peaks that extends from the city of San Luis Obispo to Morro Bay. You can count all nine of these peaks as you make the drive from San Luis Obispo to Morro Bay.

Another one of the peaks was made famous when local contractor and restaurant owner Alex Madonna was trying to develop a project on the peak located near his famous restaurant and hotel, The Madonna Inn. The Madonna Inn itself is also a famous stop for tourist traveling up the coast. The New York Times called the Madonna Inn a fantasy themed hotel of excesses and charm.

Western Artist Jim Rey

October 15th, 2016

Western Artist Jim Rey

Image Left: Mustang Mama by Jim Rey

Having grown up in a ranching family, western artist Jim Rey naturally loves working with horses and cattle. His eyes light up when he talks about training his Border Collie or a particularly wary horse, the days he has spent gathering cows in the high county or following a herd of wild horses. The paintings of Jim Rey tell the story of cowboys as living remnants of a bygone era. The stories he paints are both his own and those of the people and places he knows and loves.

The work of Jim Rey is collected nationally and internationally. His art has been exhibited in the Fredric Remington Museum in New York, as well as in many noted shows and exhibitions. His paintings have been used by Bantam Books and Encyclopedia Brittanica. Articles have been published in magazines including Southwest Art, art of the West, artists of the Rockies and International Fine art Magazine. The work of Jim Rey has also been featured in such newspapers as The Denver Post, The Rocky Mountain News, The Durango Herald, The Vail Times and The Aspen Times.

Jim Rey and his wife, Sharon have recently moved from Southwest Colorado to a farm in the sand hills north of Mitchell, Nebraska, in search of wide open spaces and fewer people. The open plains to the south and east, the Rocky Mountains to the west and the cattle ranges to the north are an inspiration for his paintings of life in the American West.

Having grown up in a ranching family, western artist Jim Rey naturally loves working with horses and cattle. His eyes light up when he talks about training his Border Collie or a particularly wary horse, the days he has spent gathering cows in the high county or following a herd of wild horses. The paintings of Jim Rey tell the story of cowboys as living remnants of a bygone era. The stories he paints are both his own and those of the people and places he knows and loves.

The work of Jim Rey is collected nationally and internationally. His art has been exhibited in the Fredric Remington Museum in New York, as well as in many noted shows and exhibitions. His paintings have been used by Bantam Books and Encyclopedia Brittanica. Articles have been published in magazines including Southwest Art, art of the West, artists of the Rockies and International Fine art Magazine. The work of Jim Rey has also been featured in such newspapers as the The Denver Post, The Rocky Mountain News, The Durango Herald, The Vail Times and The Aspen Times.


Jim Rey and his wife, Sharon have recently moved from Southwest Colorado to a farm in the sand hills north of Mitchell, Nebraska, in search of wide open spaces and fewer people. The open plains to the south and east, the Rocky Mountains to the west and the cattle ranges to the north are an inspiration for his paintings of life in the American West.

Click to see more Jim Rey art


How To Stretch Canvas Prints and Paintings and Maybe Avoid Framing

October 9th, 2016

No, Im not going to get into the nitty-gritty of building a stretcher frame, mitering the corners, and discussing what sort of pliers or automatic stretching and stapling machine you should use. I want to talk about stretching from the aesthetic point of view and explain the three basic options in stretching your canvas.

There are typically three different methods to stretch your canvas. These methods would be applicable to either a print on canvas, a canvas transfer or an original oil on canvas.

The first is the Standard Wrap method. This is where the canvas is stretched with 100% of the image on the front. None of the image is on the sides, and the staples are showing on the sides. This method definitely yells out, Frame me. Otherwise, those nasty staples and possibly the ragged edges of the canvas will show on the sides.

The second method is the Museum Wrapped. In a Museum Wrap, 100% of the image is showing on the front with the image going right up to the edges, and the plain white canvas is showing on the sides.

In this methoed, the staples are on the back and do not show. The sides are then treated to the owners specifications. In many cases, the sides are painted black. In others, the sides are painted some color that is complimentary to the colors in the artwork itself. This should be the stretching method of choice where important elements of the image are run right up to the sides and truncating them by wrapping the image on the sides would compromise the image and the artists intentions.

The third method is the Gallery Wrap. Here is where the image is stretched around the sides of the stretcher frame and the staples are on the back. The image is taken right up to the back edge of the sides and shows on the sides.

Both the Gallery and the Museum Wrap lend themselves to be hung with or without a frame. However, if you use the Gallery Wrap and a frame, the image on the sides is lost.

In artwork like the new Rodney White prints on canvas, the different stretching methods become important issues. Rodney White is probably the hottest artist in America right now. His prints are full bleeds, where the image is all the way to the edge of the paper. He also paints words that are already truncated right up to the edge of the image. If you use the Gallery Wrap method, you are going to lose even more of the words that are an important part of his images. Go to [http://www.RodneyWhiteeBay.com] to view his work, and you will easily see what I mean. The Museum Wrap should be the stretching method of choice on these prints. It leaves you with the option of framing or hanging it without a frame. Either would work and would not interfere with the image.

In considering seascapes or landscapes, where the image is merely a continuation all the way to the edges, the Gallery Wrap is very effective. There are also many images where there is plenty of negative space or an abundance of sky and/or grass where this method is also effective and aesthetically pleasing.

Finally, heres a little tip on hanging your Museum or Gallery Wrapped canvas. You may want to consider hanging it from the stretcher frame itself with no hanger hardware. I like my unframed canvases to hang flush against the wall. I achieve this by putting two nails in the wall about 6 inches apart, making sure I get them level. You can use small a carpenters level for this. Then I merely hang the piece on the nails. Use the proper size picture hangers if weight is of a concern. But most unframed canvases are fairly light. Make sure you use two nails so that it will stay level. That also works when hanging artwork with wire hangers on the back.

No permission is needed to reprint an unedited copy of this story as long as the writer's bio and the links are left intact and included.

Floyd Snyder owned and operated three framing galleries for nearly 20 years. After selling his business in the late 80s and retiring from a successful career in the stock markets he has returned to the trade he has always loved and missed. He has established his own online store representing some of finest artist in the world at FASGallery.com.

To see samples of each version of stretching by going to FASGallery.com and follow the links to Wall Art, Canvas and view the stretching options.

Losing the Copyright Battle

October 4th, 2016

Losing the Copyright Battle

I recently had dinner at a Red Robin restaurant. RR, as you may know, covers their walls with posters and art prints.

I was sitting in a booth next to a wall with a big ugly black and white print of a cat drawing. At the table next to me there were two couples sitting there. They looked like your average to above averages, mid 30s folks that could be lawyers, doctors, accountants, or some other profession. They were well dressed and sipping martinis.

One of them pointed to me, or what I thought was at me, but was actually just showing her friend the cat print and told her I wish I had that print for my daughter's room.

Her friend jumped up, pulled a camera out of her bag and came over to our table and asked if I mind if she took a picture of the print. She was very nice about it. I handed her a business card and said, I dont mind, but I am sure the artist would not like it and told her that if she went to the website she could buy any number of cat prints that may work for her friend. She looked at me like I was crazy and said why should I buy one when this one is free for the taking?

I told here because what she was planning on doing was a violation of the copyright laws. She asked me if I was out of my mind and told me that if they did not want us to copy the art, they would not have it hanging on the walls where anyone can take a picture of it.

I told her that she obviously did not understand the laws and that if she would give me her email, I would send here some links. She got red in the face, told me to go F myself, clicked off several pics and went back to her table. She told the other gal and the guys what I had said and they looked at me and the girls both flipped me the bird. Their husbands (?) were laughing their butts off and high-fiving the girls like I guess you told that a******e!

These were probably very nice people. Very upper, middle class, well to do and well-educated people.

But that ladies and gentleman is what you are up against.

These people dont know and they dont care about copyright laws.

Advertising Your FAA Artistwebsite

September 5th, 2016

Advertising Your FAA Artistwebsite (Premium Account or Website)

The purpose of this article is to address the needs of the artist on FAA trying to balance their time between creating their art and selling it.

You simple cannot do it all. Not effectively.

When is enough, enough and maybe too much? One of the biggest mistakes that I see FAA members doing is advertising with no advertising plan what so ever. They think that all they have to do is post a few times to Facebook or Tweet here and there and that's it. Or they are out there thinking they have to be on everything. Total market saturation. Neither one is the right way to go.

There are a lot of ways of advertising your FAA artwork. But in order to do that you first have to understand something about basic advertising.

Advertising on the net is not totally different then advertising main stream media. But it is different. The vehicles you use are obviously different but the basic concepts are the same. You have to reach the market place and prospective buyers with your product in a way that is most likely to give you results.

Lets look at the different vehicles we see most often used by successful sellers on FAA.

Facebook is probably the number one, with Twitter number two. Then you have all the rest of the social media including G+, LinkedIn, About. Me and on and on. Equate those to off the net adverting vehicles like TV, radio, newspaper, billboards, etc, etc. Put these aside for a minute because, for the purpose of this discussion we are not going to use them to promote your AW on FAA but we are going lean form them.

Now lets talk about the different approaches. To keep this as simple as possible, let's look at two different approaches to adverting.

First there is Direct Advertising or Target Marketing or Market Specific. Someone reinvents a new name for it every year or so, but it is still the same thing that it has been for 200 years.

Then you have Institutional Advertising, Generic, Top of the Mind Awareness and again all the new names people have come with.

I am assuming you have at least a basic understanding of the two different approaches above. Here is a very simple example of each.

If I have a photograph of a cowboy on a horse, I would target the western, cowboy, horse market using Twitter, FB Groups or any other vehicle where I could identify this people. I pretty simple stuff, I know, bear with me. I would do this my using the right hash tags and joining the right FB groups.

Institutional advertising would differ in that I would not necessarily even mention a photograph but would instead just be posting to Facbook or Tweeting "Visit FASGallery.com, see the best artwork on the net". I would be promoting the "institution" FASGallery to everyone, not to a specific photograph and not to a specific market. This goes to Top of the Mind Awareness. Still really boring I know, but stay with me.

What you are trying to do is the same thing All State Insurance has done with "The Good Hands People" or McDonald's with the Golden Arches. It is a form of branding. We do marketing surveys for specific industries. We ask people what is the first think you think of when I say "golden arches" or "the good hands people".

All of these things have to be taken into consideration of any advertising plan. But now we have to talk about the meat of that plan. How do you reach the market in a meaningful way that will get you the best results?

When you get ready to actually launch your plan, you simple cannot do it all. Everyone has limits. We are talking non-paid advertising but it still cost something. The currency is time. And you simply cannot be on Facebook, Twitter, G+, About.Me, LinkedIn, and on and on and on. Not effectively. It is just simply not the best use of you time because the frequency is going to be too thin to really make the impact you need to make. You will not reach the market penetration that you will need to be effective.

This is where we start talking about Vertical Reach and Horizontal Reach, the meat of any plan.

Most people are not in a position to where they can go for total market saturation. They need to focus, limit the number of vehicles you chose to use and then use them wisely.

Here is an example. If you were advertising on radio, and there was 10 radio stations in your market, more the likely you would not have enough money to be on all of them. You would have to choose. If your budget is $1000, you would be much better off running $500 dollars on two stations instead of $100 each on all 10. $100 is simply not enough to achieve decent market penetration. It would be a waste of money.

Vertical vs Horizontal: Vertical: $500 on each of two stations. Horizontal: $100 on each of 10 stations.

In this case your $100 simple will not give you the market penetration you need to get any decent results.

If you are still with me, we now need to talk about one of the biggest reasons, besides the cost why you cannot effectively do all of the Social Media outlets. With Social Media, unlike radio, TV, newspaper and other traditional adverting vehicles you have to build your own audience. You actually have to advertise you advertising vehicle. You have to build up your own followers and friends and circles; your audience.

For advertising to be work, you have to reach some level of market penetration. You have to be in that market, advertising your gallery, often enough to make an impact, to penetrate the market.

Think of it the same way all great speech writers do when they write a speech. To make a point stick in the audience's mind they know they have to repeat that point three times. "Tell'em, tell'em what you told'em and then tell'em again".

Applying what we have known about advertising for 200 years and from leaning what we have from radio and television, 50 tweets a day or posts to Facebook, will be more effective then 5 posts a day on ten different Social Media vehicles. It will also give you more time to create your art because you do not have to manage all of those different outlets. You can actually make fewer posts to a smaller market and have better results and at same time because you are getting better market penetration which will give you better results.

In closing (thank goodness) pick one or two, maybe 3 vehicles, build up a targeted market as best you can and do the best you can to penetrate that market. I personally think two is plenty and the two that I find easiest to build a following on are Facebook and Twitter. It is obvious that if you have the time, and can give the time, the more vehicles you can do a good jog on, the better off you will be.

As this applies to FAA, if you have 1000 images, you can afford to spend the time to be a more outlets. If you under 200, you cannot. You need to be creating art AND doing marketing. The fewer products you have the more effective your limited advertising has to be. The more important it is that you focus and get the biggest bang for your buck that you can.

But the bottom line is you have to have an advertising plan and you have to be committed to it and stick to it. Plan your work and work your plan as the old saying goes.

Watching Your Views is a Waste of Time

August 15th, 2016

FAA Views and Visitors

One of the questions that comes up most often from new member and some old is about the views supplied to us by FAA. Unfortunately they are not what you would think they are or what you hope they would be.

For the most part they are nothing more than web crawlers, bots, spiders, automatic indexer, ants, web scutter or one of the other names they have been called over the years. But basically they are all the same thing. They are computers that are programmed to scour the Internet for new content by the many different search engine companies. They can originate, and do, from many locations from around the world.

Every webpage in the world is visited by these bots to search for new content so it can be added to the various search engines.

The real thing you need to realize is that they are about 80 or 90 percent of all of your views. They are not human, they cannot buy a thing and do not buy a thing. Yes, someone will challenge that as say that there is no way to tell if they are a shopper or because there are people living in those cities that may very well be shoppers. And that is true. But considering that you have no way of knowing how to separate the bots from the live people, and noting to gain even if you could, it is a moot point. Suffice to say the vast majority are not shoppers.

I have a total of 12 retail stores on the Internet, 5 on eBay, Amazon and several stand alone sites. None of the counter of visitor data gathered from these sites include bot visits. For some reason FAA chooses to include the bot visits. Not sure I have ever seen any reason why, they just do. But that, imho, renders the visitor or views data nearly if not totally useless.

You will see threads go on and on about the bots and views but I have yet to see anything that I myself find useful. You may differ and should read at least some of those threads yourself so you can make up your own mind.

There is some small amount of validity that the number of views will give you a small bump in the search ranking. So some people spend a lot of time trying to get views from other members of FAA. I find this a totally waste of time. The tiny bump in the search is never going to amount to additional sales anywhere near as much as few sales will. And also know that other FAA member buy very little art from other FAA members.

To me, the time is much better spent advertising and marketing outside of FAA. That is where I spend my time. That is how I manage to sell on a daily bases. You have to make up your own mind.

Here are some other selling guides you may find of interest.

The "Work Smarter Not Harder To Beat The Big Guys" article has more about views and their value.


Selling Guides for New Members by Floyd Snyder

Advertising Your Artist Website
Response to new FAA member looking for advice 25/75 Rule
Another Response To A New Member Seeking Help
A Few Reasons Why You May Not Be Selling
Work Smarter Not Harder To Beat The Big Guys
50 Effective Tips to Help You Sell You Art




What do you know about selling

June 22nd, 2016

As soon as you became a professional artist you also became a wholesaler, a retailer and a salesman, rather you like it or not. The old saying of "build a better mouse trap and the world will beat a path to your door", well it just doesn't work that way.

You can be the greatest artist in the world but if you fail to get enough people to see your work, it will not sell. And even after you get all these people to your work, it still will not sell itself, that is another misnomer.

So what do you know about advertising and selling? If you are like most artist, the answer is little or nothing. Why?

Why would enter you a field that is so dependent on advertising and selling and not prepare yourself properly to at least make an honest attempt at being able to perform the basic tasks of needed to be successful?

Selling is not just gripping and grinning and "talking" people into doing something they do not want to do. In fact, if you expect to have a lasting, repeat clientele, it is the exact opposite.

On the net you don't even talk to people in person. But you can still use basic selling techniques through your advertising and your first contact with your potential client base all the way through to the sale.

I ask people all the time if they understand the relationship of Pavlov's dog and selling. Do you understand the association of the Hierarchy of Needs and selling? Do you understand the selling is problem solving and not actually selling at all.

People scoff at me like I am nuts. But the same people are complaining that they know nothing about sales and they can't figure out how to sell their work. Why would anyone with no sales experience, no basic knowledge no understanding of selling, think they should be able to sell.

This idea that the best art will sell itself is hog wash. How in the world are people going to even find it to buy if you can't get it seen?

Most of the advertising on the net is writing ad copy. I see people say they post a hundred times a day on the FB but they don't see the results. Ya, because you have know idea on how to write effective ad copy. In fact I sees so much bad ad copy form FAA members that is not only ineffective, but is more likely to be solicit a negative response.

Do you know the difference between an aggressive call to action, and soft sell, a generic, top of the mind awareness ad and when and where and why to use them in different circumstances?

How about vertical and horizontal frequency?

This is not rocket science or brain surgery. A few classes, one on marketing, salesmanship and advertising will greatly improve you knowledge and better prepare you to achieve the success you deserve.

Four Facebook Groups for FAA and of Pixels Members to Consider

March 29th, 2016

Fyi: Facebook Groups

I started four Facebook groups for members of FAA to consider joining and posting their art work too. I though you may be interested.

Here are the links to the groups.

Over a year back I stated a Facebook group that has over 2300 members now. It is only for FineArtAmerica members. It can be found here:

FineArtAmerica https://www.facebook.com/groups/WesternArtBuyersAndSellers/


I also stated three other Facebook groups. One is for anyone that does western art and only western art and another is for anyone that does Seascape art and only seascape art. Here are the links:

Western Art Buyers & Sellers https://www.facebook.com/groups/1403150156590398/

Seascape Art Buyers & Sellers https://www.facebook.com/groups/1473698576246013/


I also have another Facebook group that is for anyone that buys or sells on eBay. Anyone with an eBay account can join and you can only list eBay items for sale so this one is not so much for FAA members but you are welcome to join if you do buy or sell on eBay.

eBay Buyers & Sellers https://www.facebook.com/groups/741852785862849/

If you ask to join the FineArtAmerica group, please us the same name exactly as the one use on FAA so it can be easily verified.

Enjoy! Floyd Snyder FASGallery.com

The Artwork of Bruce Cheever

January 22nd, 2016

The Artwork of Bruce Cheever

Bruce Cheever remembers his interest in art started as a child. His natural, artistic talent led him to enjoy success as an illustrator for many years, eventually leading to a career as a fine artist. During his years spent in illustration, he gained much knowledge, along with an ability of observation and discipline in the arts. He also credits his education at BrighamYoung University as a positive influence in his success. In this formative period of his
career, he also discovered an affinity for tonalism and luminism. The artists atmospheric and bucolic paintings are suggestive of Renaissance landscapes. This passion for the landscape is driven by the never-ending search for beauty.

Cheever states, "Art is a visual language and, as an artist, my hope is that my work is not just paint on a board, but rather a combination of inspiration, emotion, and skill to inspire the human soul. As primarily a landscape painter, I strive to evoke emotion in the spirit of those who view my work and to give them a sense of place within the landscape. My hope is that I can touch the chords of nostalgia and beauty that lie within each of us, and
further hope to inspire others to pay attention to the simple beauties of life.

Today, Cheevers studio paintings take shape from the inspiration he gathers from his travels. Whether painting a rural scene in the American West or a pastoral European landscape, his art is emerging with a style of its own. The artist adds, "My objective is to inspire others through art and to participate in reminding mankind that the world can be good if we consciously take the time to appreciate what is around us. I am inspired by the ordinary and moved by the extraordinary and feel that both are equal in beauty, if careful attention is given to both. I thank God for His gifts to me and the ability to share them with others. I simply believe that we are all given glimpses of divinity to sooth our souls, and that each of us is given
gifts to share with one another.

Cheever is represented by Trailside Galleries in their Jackson and Scottsdale locations.He exhibits at many invitational shows, including showcases with Trailside Galleries, and he also participates in group shows with Settlers West Gallery in Tucson, Arizona, and Howard Mandville Gallery in Kirkland, Washington. He has exhibited at the prestigious Masters of the American West Show at the Autry National Center in Los Angeles, at the Jackson Hole Art Auction, and at the Arts for the Parks, where he is one of the top 100 winners. His work has been featured in Art of the West, Southwest Art, Western Art Collector, and American Art Collector magazines.
-End-

We are authorized dealers of Bruce Cheever Fine Art Giclees. For the best price on his prints visit our eBay Store at FrameHouseGalleryeBay.com, search on "Cheever" and make us an offer we can not refuse! I you would like more information on sizes or any other information email me at Floyd@FASGallery.com

Why All Artists Need An On-Going Marketing Plan

December 1st, 2015

Marketing is not an event, but a process . . . It has a beginning, a middle, but never an end, for it is a process. You improve it, perfect it, change it, even pause it. But you never stop it completely. This is how Jay Conrad Levinson, author and co-author of several marketing books that includes Guerrilla Marketing, gives meaning to the concept of Marketing.

A marketing plan is a necessity for any business that hopes to thrive. And if you are a professional artist, you are running a business, like it or not. With that, you must consider the big picture. Think of your marketing plan as strategizing the specifics for a journey. Just as the captain of a ship charts a course for his voyage, an artist entrepreneur must develop a marketing plan. There are many things to consider.

First, spend some time and focus on what your objectives and goals are, whether they are primarily for recognition or for financial gain. Most importantly, the course set forth to reach the goals must be measurable in terms of its effectiveness. Is what you are doing helping you make progress toward your established goals? If the steps of your plan are not efficient, you are wasting time and energy. As the business owner, you are in the best position to analyze the appropriateness of the individual steps of your plan. Take time to ponder the details of your marketing course.

Look at your audience, and get to know your potential buyers. Will your plan be directed at corporate buyers, commercial projects, gallery affiliations, individual collectors, or others? Philip Kotler is the author of Marketing Management: Analysis, Planning, Implementation and Control, which has become a definitive source for graduate business schools throughout the world. He said this about knowing your buyers, Authentic marketing is not the art of selling what you make but knowing what to make. It is the art of identifying and understanding customer needs and creating solutions that deliver satisfaction to the customers, profits to the producers and benefits for the stakeholders.

Are you utilizing your resources in the most productive way so that your message is reaching your audience? Make sure you have a designated receiver (audience) of your message and that you are not just putting information out there without having a specific target in mind. A captain of a ship charts his course for a specific port and sets sail for it in the most expedient manner. The ship is not just out on the ocean floating around, and you cant let your business just flounder around either.

Next, look at your timeline and what money you have to spend for your marketing plan. You must have a realistic timeframe established and the monetary backing to carry through with the plan. However, the plan must still be a flexible, on-going document. You need to continually check the current status of your business so that you know where you are and what changes need to be made in the plan along the way. Even though part of the plan may need to change in order to help meet the long range needs, it is also a living, breathing document that will still serve the day-to-day operations of the business.

A rule of thumb is to consider your customer first. Without them you have no business, at least not a thriving business. Whether you are planning a fair, show, or a first exhibit, you must have established you core beliefs about your potential customers. Prioritize those beliefs. This will help you further refine your target and generate options for your decision-making regarding your business plan.

Traditionally, many artists are not predisposed to marketing what they produce. If this be true in your case, then seriously consider getting someone with marketing expertise to help you with your marketing goals.

Creating your on-going marketing plan with your potential customers in mind is the most important thing you can do besides producing your artwork. In the words of Orvel Ray Wilson, President of The Guerrilla Group and renown speaker on marketing and management, Customers buy for their reasons, not yours.

FineArtAmerica and other Facebook Groups for FAA member

October 13th, 2015

To use Facebook and maximize the potential you have to join and be active in groups. The number of friends and likes and comment are nice, but what really counts is how many people see your Facebook posts that are members of the art buying public and not just fellow artists.

Over a year back I stated a Facebook group that has over 2300 members now. It is only for FineArtAmerica members. It can be found here:

FineArtAmerica


I also stated three other Facebook groups. One is for anyone that does western art and only western art and another is for anyone that does Seascape art and only seascape art. Here are the links:

Western Art Buyers & Sellers

Seascape Art Buyers & Sellers


I also have another Facebook group that is for anyone that buys or sells on eBay. Anyone with an eBay account can join and you can only list eBay items for sale so this one is not so much for FAA members but you are welcome to join if you do buy or sell on eBay.

eBay Buyers & Sellers





50 Effective Tips to Help You Sell You Art

June 12th, 2015

50 Effective Tips to Help You Sell You Art from www.artpromotivate.com

(To be perfectly clear, I did not write this and I am not claiming I did)

Selling art online partly depends on exposing it to as many people as you can. The more people who see your art, the higher the potential of someone contacting you for purchase. But, even though posting your art in as many places as possible may be a good thing, there are some things to realize before even doing that.

First of all, I recommend you learn everything about the business of art, from constructing a plan of attack to closing a sale.

It is very easy to ruin an artists reputation by just promoting haphazardly without first thinking about how you want yourself portrayed by others.

This is just one effective tip to help in selling your art, and make money from what you love doing.

Here are 50 more:


1. Approach the promotion of your art like it is your job.

2. Consistently promote your artworks and do not waiver in your goal to make money from what you love doing.

3. Create series of artworks based on the ones you have received the most positive feedback.

4. Follow other artists and respond to trends in what people are buying.

5. Realize that there is a market for your artwork whatever you create. You just have to find it!

6. Begin promoting your art locally, then expand from there.

7. Relate your unique personality through your art.

8. Enjoy interacting with people and talking about your art with them.

9. Learn everything there is to know about art marketing. (Subscribe to Artpromotivate!)

10. Get a professional website to either showcase your best artworks for referring to potential buyers, or to sell it.

11. Work on gathering followers for your art business through social networking and an email list.

12. Brand yourself by using the same profile picture and possibly a logo everywhere you create a profile on the internet.

13. Work on taking the best quality photographs to exhibit your paintings online.

14. Dont think of making money from your art when you are creating just think of making the best artwork you possibly can!

15. Learn to talk about your art effectively and explain it to others.

16. Keep growing in your artistic development.

17. Promote your art everywhere (but do not spam).

18. Only display your best paintings on the internet.

19. Create an art blog.

20. Create a Facebook page for your art business, and follow all the great tips we share for attracting fans.

21. Know your target audience either decide on one or track the demographic of your regular art buyers.

22. Make a plan for they building of your art career.

23. If you do not have time to do certain things related to art promotion, such as building a website, think about outsourcing. Hire a web designer or someone to promote artworks for you.

24. Selling Art OnlineJoin art communities online and offline.

25. Create a portfolio to present your artwork to buyers.

26. Create a resume and update it regularly.

27. Work on an art statement, and update this occasionally.

28. Enter art competitions and calls for entry.

29. Open yourself up to doing commission work.

30. Host an open studio event.

31. Price your artwork according to your artistic progress.

32. Never lower your prices and avoid discounting in excess.

33. Include a certificate of authenticity for artwork with every piece.

34. Create art that affects people emotionally.

35. Donate your art occasionally to charities and hold fundraisers.

36. Hold contests and giveaways at your artist website, art-blog, and Facebook pages.

37. Create special promotions around holidays such as Christmas.

38. Sign all your artworks on the front.

39. Get out there! Dont be afraid to show your artworks anywhere even in untraditional settings.

40. Create press releases for your events.

41. Develop a unique style!

42. Follow other artists who create similar artwork as yours.

43. Become a writer and publish books about your art and life!

44. Work on creating smaller artworks that are more affordable.

45. Set goals for yourself, and reward yourself when you achieve them.

46. Build a relationship with people in the local media.

47. Keep a positive attitude!

48. Create LOTS of art!

49. Have fun!

50. Never give up!

About the Artist Nancy Cawdrey

June 1st, 2015

About the Artist Nancy Cawdrey

About Nancy Cawdrey

"Whatever medium I am working in, I like to mix color on the surface of the painting--giving the work more immediacy and spontaneity--what I call spirited painting. [On silk] I [can] really float brilliant color with spirit and gusto."
-Art Life, Fall/Winter 2001-2002

We have this beautiful Limited Edition piece in both a paper lithograph and a stretched canvas. Both are Signed and Numbered Limited Editions.

Nancy Dunlop Cawdrey is the daughter of a retired career officer, fortunate enough to be exposed to exotic cultures throughout her childhood. In whatever country her father was stationed, Nancy immersed herself in the culture, and her affection for the arts later led her to study two years in Paris and another five years in Britain.

Nancy loves color, texture and pattern. She began her painting career 35 years ago and worked predominately in watercolor. Through her pursuit for texture and passion for color, Nancy discovered the spontaneity and brilliance she could create through painting on silk, a Chinese technique that has been practiced for thousands of years. And, although silk painting is now her medium of choice, she continues to explore a variety of subjects in watercolor, pastel, oil and experimental media. Often, we see a mixture of media in her silk compositions. Through this overlaying of various media she creates buoyant color and texture with her combination of transparent pigment and the shimmer of silk.

A colorist with a strong sense of design, Nancy's work always evokes a response, whether she is creating one of her signature western figure pieces, a breathtaking landscape, a quiet corner of Venice, or a vibrant floral.

Nancy moved to Montana 22 years ago and settled near Bigfork on Fox Creek Slough near Flathead Lake where Montana's expansiveness serves as the primary inspiration for her work. She also enjoys traveling to the Southwest and abroad to paint on-site plein air studies.

Represented in galleries in Jackson, Cody, Carmel, and Bigfork. Her work is included in invitational art shows across the West, like the Annual C. M. Russell Show and Auction, The Buffalo Bill Art Show and Sale, National Cowgirl Museum "Heart of The West" Invitational, the Cowgirl Up! Show at The Desert Caballeros Museum.She is a Signature Member on the Montana Watercolor Society. Her work is exhibited in many private and corporate collections across the country and in Europe.

A Limited number of her images are available from Nancy directly through Fox Creek Publishing as Giclee Fine Art Reproductions on both canvas and 100% cotton rag paper. A few images are published as limited edition prints by Toh-Atin Gallery and Publishing. A new book about her work, Sky''s the Limit: The Art of Nancy Dunlop Cawdrey is now available.

The Story of G. Harvey and his Artwork

May 17th, 2015

The Story of G. Harvey and his Artwork

G.Harvey and his images have influenced a worldwide enthusiasm and demand for contemporary American art for a generation. Few artists have intrigued and captivated art collectors as widely as the celebrated painter, G. Harvey. During his storied career, G. Harvey has painted turn-of-the-century America as no other artist. His scenes are warm, thoughtful portraits of our countrys bustling cities in a more genteel era and outstanding Western sagas of working cowhands at home in rugged landscapes.

Gerald Harvey Jones, known to his patrons and peers as G. Harvey, grew up in the rugged hills in Central Texas where herds of longhorn cattle were driven along the dusty trails. This background has been the inspiration for the artists commitment to portraying the spirit of America. Through his art, our countrys history lives. Harvey restores all those memories, sights, sounds, and emotions. With his ability to capture the drama, light, and feeling of a moment, the artist brings the heart of his painting to the viewer.

G. Harvey is not only an extraordinary painter, but an accomplished sculptor. His original works and bronze sculptures are in the collections of major corporations, prestigious museums, American presidents, governors, foreign leaders, and captains of industry. The artist has been the recipient of innumerable awards and the subject of four books. Harvey has been honored with one-man shows at the Smithsonian Institution and the National Archives in Washington, D. C.

The artists original paintings are represented in major galleries. His annual, one-man shows are consistent sell-outs where Harvey collectors come from all around the country to view and compete to own an outstanding work by the artist.

G. Harvey lives in the beautiful Texas Hill Country with his wife, Pat, where they enjoy living near their children and grandchildren. A studio adjacent to his home is a sanctuary for creating the paintings that his legions of devoted collectors eagerly anticipate with each new work.
G. Harveys work reminds us that the world has changed very much and very little; country lanes and city streets are still romantic. It is, after all, from living in the present that the artist draws inspiration for the past.

Martin Grelle and His Artwork.

May 16th, 2015

 Martin Grelle and His Artwork.

Martin Grelle

The image shown is called: Apsaroke Guardian

Whether painting the Native Americans in a dramatic, picturesque setting, or the American cowboy in the dusty cattle-working pens, Martin Grelle captures the spirit, beauty, and vastness of the West in his historically-accurate, compelling images. Grelle studies diligently to portray the diverse cultures of the American West accurately and with sensitivity. His knowledge of the cowboys way of life, gained from his time spent horseback on ranches during the annual Cowboy Artists of Americas (CAA) trail ride, as well as the time spent with local ranchers and friends, is evident in his contemporary cowboy paintings. The many hours spent in museums, at historical re-enactments, in visiting with experts on Native American culture, and reading from his extensive library, have helped him to bring his vision of the Plains Indian culture to life on canvas.
Grelle was born when his family lived on a small farm a few miles from the small, Central Texas town of Clifton, which he still calls home today. This beautiful and historic area has become a mecca for artists, including many of Grelles close friends. They all enjoy getting together to "talk art, critique each others work, and exchange ideas. Many of them, including Grelle, teach annual workshops through a local art facility known as the Bosque Conservatory, which has begun to have a national presence. Grelle treasures this feeling of community and the opportunities he is afforded living in such a creative environment.

The artists talents were evident as a child and he began painting at an early age. Luckily for the budding painter, acclaimed Western artists James Boren and Melvin Warren had settled in the same area while he was in school. With excellent guidance from James Boren, a full-time artist was born in his early twenties. Since then, Grelle has studied and traveled widely to seek subject matter for his work. Working primarily in oils on canvas, the artists figures and landscape become one in a painterly style rich in vibrant color and narrative.

For more than 30 years Grelle has made a career of his art, and has won awards of both regional and national importance. In 1995, he was elected to the Cowboy Artists of America, and he is one of the younger active members. He is currently serving his second term on the board of directors for that organization, and participates in the Annual CAA Exhibition and Sale at the Phoenix Art Museum each October. Grelle won the CAA Peoples Choice Award in 2002, for his painting Monarchs of the North, and the Ray Swanson Memorial Award in 2008, for his painting Newlyweds. He has also been privileged to participate in other major juried shows across the United States. Included in that list are the Prix de West Invitational Art Exhibition and Sale at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, which he has participated in each year since 1995, the Masters of the American West Fine Art Exhibition & Sale at the Autry National Center, and the inaugural Quest for the West Exhibition & Sale at the Eiteljorg Museum. Awards of merit include the Prix de West Purchase Award, which he won in 2002 for his painting Teller of Tales, and again in 2005, for his painting Two Coups, making him one of only 6 artists to have won the top award twice. Grelle has also won twice the Nona Jean Hulsey Ramsey Buyers Choice Award at Prix de West, first in 2004 with Signs Along the Snake, and again in 2006, for Dust in the Distance. The artist is represented by Overland Gallery of Fine Art, in Scottsdale, Arizona, where a one-man show is held for Grelle each March. The 2008 show marked Grelles 20th anniversary one-man show with the gallery.

The artist has been profiled in a number of publications, including the magazines Art of the West, Western Art Collector, Southwest Art, Western Art & Architecture, Persimmon Hill, American Cowboy, Western Horseman, Wild West, and InformArt. His work has also been showcased on the covers of many of these publications.

Grelle says humbly, "I thank God for the ability and the opportunities He has given me, and I hope I can continue to grow and learn more with each finished painting. I am honored by everyone who collects my work, and I will always strive to create artwork worthy of their attention, and their investment.

Other Images by Martin Grelle (You will have to use the back button to return to this page. Also make sure you bookmark this page.)

Autumns Gather
Working On The Sixes

Introducing David Mann Painter of the Native American Indian Way of Life

May 16th, 2015

Introducing David Mann Painter of the Native American Indian Way of Life

David Manns life focus has been his interest in the Native American culture, horses, and art. As a child, the artist collected any Remington and Russell prints he found along with books illustrated by Will James, Paul Brown, and Wesly Dennis.

Mann knows his subjects well from studying the history and culture of the Western Indian tribes. Born in Utah, the artist lived among the Southwestern tribes during a two-year mission in New Mexico and Arizona. During his time with the San Carlos Apache, Navajo, and Pueblo tribes, Mann adsorbed layers of meaning that give depth to the human stories he tells. This unforgettable and invaluable time spent with the Indians allowed the artist to experience first-hand the stories, dignity, and culture magic of their lives. Manns paintings are alive in rich colors, remarkable illusion of day and moonlight, and energetic or quiet compositions.

The artist seeks to capture the personal moment of truth and has the benefit of working with Indian and mountain men who model for him. Mann looks deeply into his subjects, envisioning the joys and sorrows that have contributed to the strength of a culture. The artists paintings are known for careful attention to detail including clothing, saddles, jewelry, and the many other symbols and accoutrements that are part of his subjects cultures. The combination of heart and mind, and intellect and spirit is told in the dignified presence of the Native Americans featured in the historic settings in which the artist paints them. Manns images portray the spirits of the historic, as well as the contemporary west, usually depicting moments in time rather than historical events when deeply rooted traditions provided spiritual and physical sustenance for the Native Americans.

Manns original paintings are highly collected. The artist participates in several annual art exhibits around the country; he has been the subject of numerous magazine articles.

Ragan Gennusa One of the Greats from Texas

May 14th, 2015

Ragan Gennusa One of the Greats from Texas

Ragan Gennusa grew up in East Texas enjoying the outdoors and sports, but he was drawn to art and could always be found using his pencils and brushes when he had an opportunity. Art was just something I always enjoyed, he recalls.

Gennusa took art classes in high school, along with being an All-State quarterback, and accepted a football scholarship to the University of Texas where he played wide receiver and majored in art. Gennusa credits his training as an athlete for teaching him to value courage, tenacity, and the importance of character in pursuit of life as well as an artistic career.

After college, Gennusa worked as an artist for an Austin printing company, then as a staff artist for the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department. His talent was quickly recognized, and he was eventually promoted to art department supervisor. Although he enjoyed his job at the department, the day-to-day administrative work took its toll, and he left to paint exclusively for an Austin art gallery. This decision was a turning point in Gennusas career.

Gallery work allowed Gennusa to develop his art. During this time, he became involved with the Gulf Coast Conservation Association, Ducks Unlimited, and other similar groups. Ive been fortunate to meet a lot of people in the sporting arena who liked my art, says Gennusa. The artist now has a thriving career painting the great outdoors and its endless sporting images; his many commissions to paint animals or the Western landscape are sought by people throughout the United States.

Gennusa is well known for his longhorn paintings, some of which have been special commissions for the University of Texas, and his horse images. Wild turkeys are also one of Gennusas favorite subjects. Working mostly on commission, the artist very much enjoys visiting ranches throughout Texas and learning about their history, which has fostered his interest in Western and Native American themes.

Gennusa has established a very successful art career and strives to keep up with the demand for his work. In 1986, he was selected the Texas State Artist, and he recently received the 2005 Texas Star Preservation Award from the Gillespie County Historical Society.

The artist lives in one of Texas most picturesque regions. Gennusa says, after a particularly good day of painting, I walk out of my studio overlooking the beautiful Texas Hill Country, and I truly feel that I am the richest, luckiest man on earth!

Being an artist has made my life very rewarding. The great western artist Charles Russell said, Any man that can make a living doing what he likes is lucky, and I am that. - Ragan Gennusa

Why you can not win in the search wars and should not even try

May 12th, 2015

This is a response I gave in one of the threads regarding using search to be found. It was in response to someone that had indicated that I was saying the search and keywording was not important and that I had some sort of insider information. Which I do not. But I have tracked what I have done that has lead to way better then average success compared to the most people posting in the search. But that in no way makes me one of top sellers. They simply do not post in the threads.

Here is that response:

Thank you JC for the chance to clarify that aspect of my position on keywords and the search.

First off I don't think I ever claimed any insider information. Everything I know or learned about the search is what I have read in these threads.

My position has NEVER been that the search was not important, I have consistently said you have to do the best you possible can to put keywords in the keywords box, in your titles and in your descriptions and then move on and not obsess over the search and the fact that you are not coming up as high as you would like.

From what we have been told here, and correct me if I am wrong JC, sales are the number on rating factor that will gain you search position. Then there are other considerations like, comments, likes, favorites, etc, etc.

It has been my position, based only on what I have experienced, that chasing sales is going to do more for you then obsessing over the search and trying to get as many likes, favorites, comments and all those other things.

I have outlined this in detail in one of my blogs.

Sean has made it perfectly clear that he is not going to disclose the exact weighting or the exact inter workings of the search. I understand that and it makes no difference to me whatsoever rather he does or does not give us the secrets of the search.

We are all on equal ground as far as the knowledge of how that search works. If he discloses the exact inner workings, we would all still be on equal ground. So there is nothing to gain from knowing that information if we all know it. And NO I am not suggesting that Sean is sharing it with some but not all. But again, I wouldn't care if he did.

I deal with things as I find them. I either figure out what it is and how to work it to my benefit and I keep doing it over and over again. If I can not figure out how to make it work for me.... I go somewhere else.

I have found success here on FAA doing what I am doing with no more knowledge then what I brought with me and what I have learned in these threads. Success is a personal thing. I may be a huge seller compared to some and an insignificant seller compared to others. That is why I never talk in real numbers. Actualy, again from what I have read in these threads, that is the case.

Now all of that said, I will tell you right now, your time would be much better spent learning something about business in general including marketing and advertising than worrying about your search ranking once you do the keywording like I said above.

For more information on selling on FAA read the following articles.

Work Smarter Not Harder To Beat The Big Guys
This Is My Response to Members Looking for Help
Work Smarter Not Harder To Beat The Big Guys
Another Response to a New Member Looking for Help


Another Response To A New Member Seeking Help

May 12th, 2015

Keep in mind, FAA does not sell your work in the sense that they are going bring the buyers to you. You may get a few accidently sales that way but basically you have to sell your own art OUTSIDE of FAA.

Don't get all bogged down in all of the internal, social aspects of FAA if you are seriously looking to sell your art. Do all of your advertising and marketing outside FAA through what ever channels you are comfortable with.

Most people do not want to spend money doing this so they use social media. Everyone will tell you that what they use is the best. But you have to decide that for yourself according to what you are most comfortable.

The most popular in no certain order are Facebook, Twitter, G+, Linkedin and some of the others. Some people will tell you you have to do all of them. I do not think you can do all of them and have any kind of saturation that it take to make the market penetration that will result in sales.

Again, you have to decide that for yourself according to how much time you want to spend.

The number one thing that will drive sales is the number of uploads or images you have for sale. Then how much exposure you get OUTSIDE of FAA. The groups, contests and those sort of things will NOT result in any meaningful number of sales. Your time is much better spent creating new art and promoting it outside of FAA.

At this time with only 5 images, I would not worry about any of these things. I would sped 75-80% of your time creating more art and getting more uploads. Rest of that time I would spend setting up a your Facebook and Twitter accounts (assuming those art the ones you chose to use).

And don't make the mistake of building your friends and followers of all artist. They are not going to buy. You need to find people that you would think are most likely to buy your art. Other artist are just looking to sell to you, not buy from you.

If you do use Facebook and Twitter remember, the best exposure is not through you friends and followers It is through the groups on Facebook and getting shares on both fave book and Twitter. On Twitter they call it "retreets".

More tips and suggestions:

Work Smarter Not Harder To Beat The Big Guys

This Is My Response to Members Looking for Help

Advertising How Much Is Too Much And How Much Is Not Enough

May 10th, 2015

One of the most common discussions that comes up is advertising (selling) . Particularity how much and where to advertise.

I have posted a blog: Advertising Your FAA Artistwebsite http://fineartamerica.com/blogs/advertising-your-faa-artistwebsite.html

After you read the comments below you may want to check it out.

There are some here, and I don't mean to target or embarrass anyone, that seem to know little or nothing about advertising, some hate it to the point that they refuse to do it and some know more about the subject then I will ever know.

One of things that people struggle with is the time it takes away from creating their art. I stated one time that advertising takes away from the time you have to create your art and creating your art takes away form the time you need to sell your art. What I mean by that is, you have to find a balance if you want to sell your art anywhere.

How well you will sell on FAA will, in no small part, depend on how much you have to sell on FAA. I know, some will argue against that and point to a few that have very little product and sell all the time. Given the chance to research that I believe you will find special circumstance that would explain that. The obvious one is how big of a following that artist has. But there are other extenuating circumstances as well. I am not address those issues here. I am addressing the issue for the benefit of those average sellers on FAA. Not average art or artist, but those that come into the threads nearly daily looking for help.

I have built several online stores going back way before FAA and even eBay were selling art on the Internet. One of the most common things that I have seen was the threshold of where the sales seem to take a huge leap. That threshold was 1000 items for sale. That seemed to be a magic number.

I am not suggesting that you have to have 1000 items for sale on FAA. But what I am trying to point out that there is a direct correlation between the number of products for sale and sales. This is common sense if nothing else. There is also a correlation between product mix and sales. As the old saying goes "you can not sell off an empty wagon".

If I had to suggest a number, I would say somewhere in the 200 uploads area is where I seen my first big jump in sales. But 1000 was a bigger jump and where steady sales began to take hold. I know that 1000 is huge number for most artist. Probably totally unobtainable for some. There are ways of increasing those numbers with out having 1000 individual pieces, but that is another subject.

I think that if you have less then 200 uploads and you are really concerned about selling, you need to shut out all the noise and spend the majority of your time creating more art. I have used the 25/75 rule. Spend 75% of your time creating new art and 25% selling or marketing. And selling and marketing does NOT include the groups, contests, likes and favorites or hanging out in and starting threads that do not go directly to marketing and creating. Those groups and contests, likes and favorites and creating view and followers of other FAA members are NOT going to create many if any sales.

That same time should be spent building your up Facebook friends and Twitter following or developing other ways of reaching the outside of FAA market place. There are several other free adverting vehicles but I am not going to go into them here. As you gallery grows, so will your advertising base grow. How many FAA members friend your Facebook page or follow you on Twitter is not near as important as how many people outside of FAA are following and befriending you. You simply must reach the greater art buying public to have any chance of achieving decent sales.

Product numbers are important but so is the product mix. If you have a nothing but seascapes in your gallery, you are obviously not very likely to sell to a buyer that is looking for western art.

We are not allowed, for good reasons to point out specific members of FAA so I can not show you examples. But they are there. Several of the most successful sellers that I have run across and talked to on FAA have a very diverse product line. Westerns, seascapes, florals, abstracts, wildlife and other genres. Some here will tell you that you have to focus and stay in one genre. I totally disagree. I think that you want to appeal to as many art buyers as possible.

One last thing. Some here mistakenly think that what is working for some one else will work for them. THIS IS JUST BAD THINKING!

You have to tailor an adverting plan to what is best for you. Not just do what anyone else tells you to do. I cover that in that blog in the link above.

A Few Reasons Why You May Not Be Selling

May 10th, 2015

These are not in order but I do believe that they all play a role in how much you are or are not selling.

Number of images:

As the old saying goes, you simply cannot sell off an empty wagon. Common sense would tell you that. Unless you have some sort unusual circumstance you need to have as many images as possible; hundreds, not dozens.

If you are a high profile, well known, big name artist, maybe you get away with a small number of images. But if you take a look at the largest sellers here, most of them have hundreds of images and some have a thousand or two.

I have heard all of the arguments; I only post my best, different variations just run people off, I am going for quality not quantity. Okay... if that is your position, then accept that fact of lower sales for what it is and why. If you hope to make money selling artwork, there are certain compromises you HAVE to be willing to make.

Watermarks:

The combined artwork sales of Amazon, eBay and FAA probably are higher then the next ten sellers of art on the internet combined. They will all tell you the same thing; watermarks will discourage buyers. That is the bottom line. I don't care about all the arguments that go against that opinion. If the largest sellers of artwork on the internet, people that have spent millions if not billions of dollars to maximize sales, tell you that watermarks will hinder sales, then watermarks will hinder sales!! If you hope to make money selling artwork, there are certain compromises you HAVE to be willing to make. If you want to buck that system, then more power to you. Accept that fact of lower sales for what it is and why.

Search Engine Paranoia

People are paying way to much time over worrying the search engine and keep saying how horribly bad it is and offer up 60,000 ways it can be improved. Get of it!! It is what it is. Only Sean knows exactly how it works and he has made it abundantly clear that he is not going tell us.

The thing you have to understand, THE SEARCH WORKS FOR FAA!

It works just fine and is selling artwork for Sean. Business is good over all and on the increase for FAA. There is an overhaul of the site in the works. Hopefully there will be positive changes in the new "what ever they are" changes and that will include improved search. But one thing for sure, it will not be up and running more then a week or two and there will be those that will be complaining that it does not do this or it does not that.

If all of the suggestions of what the search should be were installed, it is STILL not going to make everyone happy. It is still only going to return so many images. If you are not one of the big sellers, you are still not going to be found in the search as often as you would like. Amazon and eBay both do the same thing. They want to tilt the scales in their favor to maximize the opportunity for a sale. The don't care who it is. The only favorite sellers they have are those that sell the most images. I would do the same thing. So would you if you were in their position.

You need to do the best you can to maximize your tags and descriptions to be found in the search and the forget about it. Spend more time advertising and marketing direct links back to your images on your AW. Stop living and dying on the search results. Reach out as far away and as far outside of FAA and reach the general art buying market. THAT is how you are going to improve your sales. Not via a new and better search anywhere near as much as you think you are.

Stop looking at seasonal swings or economic conditions that may or may not be affecting sale. You can't do anything about it and you don't even know it they are really the problem. Stay positive and don't let others talk you into a funk by saying things like, "we always see lower sales in the the summer" or other such things.

Little Fish In A Big Ocean

The fact is FAA is growing. New images, hundreds if not thousands are being added every day. Sellers, some of them with huge portfolio of images are joining all the time.

This also goes hand in hand with living by the search, both FAA and Google. This is pretty simple stuff. The individual artist is more and more becoming a little fish in a huge ocean. That ocean has huge sharks and whales consuming sales at a rapid rate.

If you are going to get found, you have to go out and drag the buyers into your AW. This is going to continue to be the case.

Most see that as a negative. I don't don't. I see it as competition. If some of the best artists, galleries and museums, see FAA as "the" place to be, then so do I.

I don't care about all the complains that "stock" is the problem. First off, don't under estimate those that are refereed to as the "stock" companies. A lot of their images are very, very good, fine art images. And they sell everyday. This tells us all that there ARE buyers out there, everyday. You just have to figure out how to compete, how to get your fair share.

You can not depend on "the search" to do that for you. I don't care how much improvement is done. You are still going to be seen as a very small fish in a huge ocean as far as the search is concerned.


So let's recap:

Load as many images as you can. Consider different variations of existing images such as black and whites, sepia tones, details and other variations. Some people will tell you that that will discourage buyers. I have been selling variations of my photographs, successfully, for 40 years by doing that. That is exactly what the large sellers that are uploading image every day are doing.

Get rid of the watermarks. They DO discourage buyers. The protection is not as much as you think it is. The low res image loss is not a hard money loss. The sale of an image IS a hard money loss.

Stop living and dying by the search. Do what you can to maximize your potential to get found using searchable titles, tags and descriptions. But then more on and stop worrying about it. Do something about it instead.

Expand your reach as far outside FAA as possible. I do not believe that the contests, groups, image dump thread or spending too much time in the threads in general is of much if any value at all. Spend that time advertising you work OUTSIDE FAA.

You need to go way beyond FAA and reach out and get seen in the greater art buying community. The market place is soooo much more then FAA.

Social media such as Facebook, Twitter, G+, Linkedin and others are a place to start because it is free and it is easy to do. But they too are very limited. You have to consider other means of advertising. Direct email, press releases (with mass circulation, not the FAA supplied press release system) banner ads, pay for clicks, trading links bounce back pieces and any other way of mass marketing you can think of.

A lot of people use blogs. I don't know much about blogging. I do know about the article circulations out there that will make you articles available to people looking for content for there websites and their own blogs. Seems to me the potential of being more then one blog or website is greater then doing my own. And then I don't have to market my blog.

All that said, you HAVE to keep a positive attitude. Block out the negative Nellies and stay positive. I have never met a successful salesmen t that spent a lot of times in the "woes me" state of mind. You got to stay positive!!

The Artwork of G Harvey Published by Somerset Fine Art

May 9th, 2015

The Artwork of G Harvey Published by Somerset Fine Art

Click on the link to see more information on the image:
Gol-Durn Trouble by G. Harvey

G.Harvey and his images have influenced a worldwide enthusiasm and demand for contemporary American art for a generation. Few artists have intrigued and captivated art collectors as widely as the celebrated painter, G. Harvey. During his storied career, G. Harvey has painted turn-of-the-century America as no other artist. His scenes are warm, thoughtful portraits of our countrys bustling cities in a more genteel era and outstanding Western sagas of working cowhands at home in rugged landscapes.

Gerald Harvey Jones, known to his patrons and peers as G. Harvey, grew up in the rugged hills in Central Texas where herds of longhorn cattle were driven along the dusty trails. This background has been the inspiration for the artists commitment to portraying the spirit of America. Through his art, our countrys history lives. Harvey restores all those memories, sights, sounds, and emotions. With his ability to capture the drama, light, and feeling of a moment, the artist brings the heart of his painting to the viewer.

G. Harvey is not only an extraordinary painter, but an accomplished sculptor. His original works and bronze sculptures are in the collections of major corporations, prestigious museums, American presidents, governors, foreign leaders, and captains of industry. The artist has been the recipient of innumerable awards and the subject of four books. Harvey has been honored with one-man shows at the Smithsonian Institution and the National Archives in Washington, D. C.

The artists original paintings are represented in major galleries. His annual, one-man shows are consistent sell-outs where Harvey collectors come from all around the country to view and compete to own an outstanding work by the artist.

G. Harvey lives in the beautiful Texas Hill Country with his wife, Pat, where they enjoy living near their children and grandchildren. A studio adjacent to his home is a sanctuary for creating the paintings that his legions of devoted collectors eagerly anticipate with each new work.
G. Harveys work reminds us that the world has changed very much and very little; country lanes and city streets are still romantic. It is, after all, from living in the present that the artist draws inspiration for the past. -20-

The image above is one of many G. Harvey images we have available. If you would like more information on G. Harvey Fine Art Prints or would like special pricing considerations, please email Floyd@FASGaallery.com. You can also follow us on Twitter @FASGallery. Enjoy! - Floyd Snyder

See all of Somerset Fine Art's artists and hundreds of Signed and Numbered Limited Giclees
FASGallerys Somerset Fine Art Gallery

Meet The Working Cowboy, Western Artist of the Salute to the Texas Rangers Ranger Code Bruce Greene

May 9th, 2015

Meet The Working Cowboy, Western Artist of the Salute to the Texas Rangers Ranger Code Bruce Greene

Bruce Greene is a Western painter who has ridden trails and experienced the cowboy life he portrays in the very narrative images he creates. The artist is a native Texan who has reached the pinnacle of his profession through hard work and an extraordinary talent for painting the story of one of our country's most revered icons, the American cowboy. His scenes of contemporary cowboys going about their daily work are admired and collected across America.

Several years ago, Bruce began making annual trips to join in the spring work on the legendary JA Ranch in the Palo Duro Canyon of north Texas. As Greene describes his trip, "I go up there and stay on the chuck wagon with the JA hands and the neighbors that have come to help. We ride a lot of miles in rough country. It can be cold, hot, windy, and wet. As a matter of fact, it can be all of these in one day. A fella' could get lost in some of the mesquite or cedar thickets. Of course, we work a few cows on our place and help out a neighbor now and then, but the JA trip has been a real inspiration for me each year. I am absolutely sure that this experience has greatly affected my artwork. It seems necessary, to me, in order to depict the contemporary cowboy with accuracy and feeling. My good friend, Red Steagall, calls it 'getting the dust in your nose.' For me, that dust makes the difference."

One of Greene's most enjoyable, recent projects was creating a painting for the Texas Rangers Association Foundation commemorating and honoring the history and high standards of the Texas Rangers. The painting, titled "The Ranger Code," was purchased by members of the Foundation's board and is in the permanent collection of outstanding Ranger art at the Texas Ranger Museum in Waco.

Greene was elected to membership in the prestigious Cowboy Artists of America in 1993 and served as its President in 2003.

The artist and his family live on a small ranch in the historical community of Norse, near Clifton, Texas. Greene's studio sets on the edge of a hill behind his home. From this vantage point, large north windows offer a continuous view of the Texas Hill Country, a few Hereford cows, and the occasional whitetail deer. "It is a wonderful blessing to be able to make a living for my family doing what I love in this beautiful place," says Greene.

Greene's works are represented by several well known galleries in the Southwest. He has presented his art in annual shows and exhibition such as the Cowboy Artists of America Exhibition, the Prix de West Show at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum, and the Autry Museum of Western Heritage Sale, just to name a few, and other prestigious venues.

You are free to reprint or distribute this article as long as the statement below is present in all distributions or reprints including the web address and email address links.

If you would like to find out more about Bruce Green and his artwork you can visit our Somerset Fine Art gallery at http://www.somersetfineart.com/s-1069-greene-bruce.aspx You can also email me directly at Floyd@FrameHouseGallery.com.

Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Floyd_Snyder



Article Source: http://EzineArticles.com/7544755

Marketing Your Art - Here, There, and Everywhere by Arnold White

November 11th, 2014

Marketing Your Art - Here, There, and Everywhere by Arnold White

A professional artist's success is in direct correlation to finding the right
markets for his artwork. The million dollar question is where can I market my
art and get the most out of my efforts? First, determine if you are really serious
about selling what you make. Selling is what separates the amateur artist from the
professional artist. As an artist you are creating a product. If you believe your
product is valuable and you believe people will buy your product, then it is essential
that you identify the market for your product.

The following are the main areas you should consider: Select two or more (don't put all your eggs in one basket).

Art Galleries

Begin with developing a list of local art galleries that are within 100-200 miles of
you. Art galleries are listed in your regular or on-line yellow pages. Take the time to
personally visit each gallery on your list to determine which ones showcase the
style of art most compatible with your art. Contact the owner or director of the
gallery by telephone for a firm appointment to show your work.

Print Publishers

The print market is very profitable. When your art is in print, it is available and
affordable to the widest possible audience, and your originals become more
valuable.

Fine art publishers can be found in art trade publications such as Decor
Magazine, World Art News or On-line. Develop a list of those publishers you want
to contact. The next step would be to send them a professional presentation of your
work letting them know you are available for licensing.

Art Shows and Festivals

Outdoor shows and festivals are an excellent way for you to generate immediate
income and see first hand how the art buying public responds to your work.

Many successful artists get their start and pay their dues with this venue. There are
several Art Show and Festival promoters such as Art Fair Source Book (AFSB),
American Art Festivals, Sunshine Artist Festival Network online that conduct 100s
of these events all around the country. Dates and locations are available in
their directories, and you can contact them online or ask others artists and friends
about their experience.

Banks, Restaurants and Corporations

Thousands of works of art are showcased and sold each year in banks, restaurants,
and other private and public facilities every year. These locations are ideal
prospects for the showing and selling of your Art. Local artists, local companies
and the local public all benefit by having art displays in a bank or restaurant or
business.

Co-Op Galleries

Co-op Galleries are generally local art associations that establish a location where
fellow artists can hang their art. Contact your local art association for details about
membership.

Commission Projects

Interior designers, architects and art consultants are constantly looking for artists.
You can generally develop a list by searching your local phone directory yellow
pages or online yellow pages. Contact these firms by telephone and send them your
brochure.

Your Website

Your website is your own personal on-line gallery, open 24-7. This is a very cost
effective way to show and sell.

A first class website is like a first class brochure; but, even better, it allows you to
change and improve without reprinting.

Your website is of little value if no one goes there to view what you do. We cover
how to fully maximize your website in our website chapter.

Trade Shows and Art Expos

These are high traffic professional events where you can purchase space to
showcase and promote your art. Decor, Art-a-Rama, and the New York Expo
are a few of the major annual and semi annual productions.

Studio Showings

Your home studio is an excellent and inexpensive way to exhibit and sell your work
to friends, family and collectors. You should develop and maintain a mailing or e-
mail list and should be in contact with this list on a regular basis.

Competitions

Competitions can be good venues, but generally do not produce much income.
They can, however, add credibility to your resume or biography. Good sources for
dates and locations of competitions are available through Art Magazine and
American Artist Magazine.

Remember it is important that you choose the venues that you feel will provide the
best results for you. You may not be able to participate in all those areas, but you
need to choose two or more to begin with. Since you have many choices. choose
the marketing option that best fits you personally and puts your artwork in the best
light.

(Note: Mr. White retired some years a back. It is obvious that some of the information may be time dated. I was associated with Mr. White in several endeavors for many years. This is an article he wrote for one of the art magazines that were in circulation and has now been consolidated with several magazines and only found on the net.- Floyd Snyder)

Take Your Passion and Make It Happen Meet Keith Zimmerman

July 27th, 2014

Take Your Passion and Make It Happen Meet Keith Zimmerman

Take Your Passion and Make It Happen

By Floyd Snyder

If you have a mind for trivia and remember the movie, Flashdance, you may recall the catchy main theme song called, What A Feeling. In my head I can still hear Irene Cara belting out the words, "Take your passion and make it happen."

When I first met artist, Keith Zimmerman, I knew I had met a person that had taken his passion and had made it happen. Our meeting was at a recent local Art & Wine Festival where I noticed how his work stood out above all the other artwork being displayed. I couldn't get over the quality and meticulous detail in his pieces.

So how does one get to the level of being able to match his creative spirit with the marketability of one's labor? It often starts in childhood, as it did with Keith, with an appreciation and devoted interest in things that permeate through a person's entire life. After retiring from a non-art related career, Keith was finally able to realize his dreams through his creations that had their roots in the basement of his parents' home in Youngwood, Pennsylvania.

During his childhood carousels and merry-go-rounds fascinated Keith. He also had a love of animals. This would later result in his carvings of carousel animals and his extensive study of the different kinds of carousels and the various animals on them. Yet, Keith didn"t have just one passion. At an early age he developed a love of transportation. His interest in airplanes called for a lot of research, and gradually he became an expert on the planes used in World War I and World War II.

Keith displayed early artistic talent. By age 10 he had already started whittling and carving. However, over the years he has worked with oils and has done sculptures. Keith has even done some Dilbert-like cartoons.

With winters being quite severe and frigid in Pennsylvania, Keith could not play outside during the colder months when he was growing up. He prepared himself for the long winter by collecting materials during the summer months that would keep him busy in the basement workshop. He collected different kinds of wood, including orange crates, 5 pound cheese boxes, and an occasional cigar box.

With his supply of materials, he would spend hours creating model airplanes. In his hometown at the age of 14, he became known as 'The Airplane Guy." He also drew planes, and studied them in detail. Keith continues to make planes that are historically accurate and done to scale. It helps to have a penchant for detail.

Keith's career in industry brought him to California where he worked in Long Beach for 34 years before retiring. When he retired, he began carving carousel animals. At first he did pieces that were to be wall mounted. Later on he began doing free-standing animals along with airplanes that are also free-standing. For each of his pieces he designed a special stand to hold the perfectly balanced work of art.

In his studio you will find Fokker planes like the one the Red Baron flew in World War I right next to the Sopwith Camel. If you think about the scenes of Snoopy from the Peanuts comic strip, you will remember the tri wing Fokker and the smaller brown plane that Snoopy would fly.

If you saw the movie, Flyboys, you will also remember the bi-wing airplane that the French used against the German planes. You would see those in his studio along with Steerman Trainers used extensively by the U.S. armed forces before World War II. All in all he has more than a dozen different planes that he has researched, carved, and painted.

How long do these labors of love take from beginning to end? Keith works in 2 to 3 hours intervals and estimates a total of 24 hours in each piece. He said, "Each one takes 2 football games and 4 baseball games."

This prolific artist has also expanded his repertoire by including the pony express and a larger piece that is the Wells Fargo Stage. All animals, people and the coach are hand carved and painted. Again, the detail is amazing and the colors are brilliant. Keith has received many awards and accolades for his work, including Best of Show Awards.

Few people are fortunate enough to turn their passions and interests in to something so meaningful and enjoyable to make and sell. Keith has been given a natural talent that he has developed and shared with his fans through the years. Thankfully, this artist took his passion and made it happen.

Seascape And Nature Photographer Barbara Snyder Joins FASGallery

July 11th, 2014

Seascape And Nature Photographer Barbara Snyder Joins FASGallery

July 11th, 2014 - Santa Maria, CASeascape and Nature Photographer Barbara Snyder Joins FASGallery

Fasgallery is owned and operated by S&S Enterprises, owners of several on-line art galleries specializing in fine art reproductions. photographer Barbara Snyder is one of the new editions to the line-up of artist and photographers.


Santa Maria, CA, March 15, 2013 -- The fine art Giclee prints of seascape photography by Barbara Snyder are now available at FASGallery, follow the FASGallery link or go directly to Barbaras portfolio at: http://fasgallerycom.artistwebsites.com

FASGallery.net is owned and operated by S&S Enterprises, owners of several on-line art galleries specializing in fine art reproductions.

Barbara Snyder joins the line-up of artists that includes Bruce Green, Karen Noles, G. Harvey, Rod Chase, Larry Dyke, June Dudley, Andy Thomas and many others. You can view the work of these artists by following the Somerset link at FASGallery.net.

Barbara Snyder was born the Central Coast of California making her a California Native. Barbara graduated from California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo as a history major, English minor. She earned her Master's degree in education from the same university and began a teaching career that has spanned over 3 decades before retiring from education to peruse photography as a second career.

Being a co-owner of an art and frame gallery several years past has provided experiences that have added to her repertoire of skills and versatility in thinking. Barbara has been featured in Strictly Business Magazine, a Central Coast publication, designed to showcase local talents and to celebrate the entrepreneurial spirit. She has also written several articles and provided photographic contributions to that and other publications.

While Barbara is likely to capture the image of almost anything that catches her eye, her lifelong love of the picturesque California Coastline is the subject she loves to photograph the most.

Barbaras seascape images as well as other subjects can be seen at FASGallerys home at Fine Art America by following the FASGallery link at FASGallery.

FASGallery is owned and operated by S&S Enterprises a Floyd Snyder Production. For more information contact Floyd Snyder at Floyd@FrameHouseGallery.com or telephone (805) 922-3371.

Rodney White Americas Hottest Artist Move Over Andy Warhol

June 8th, 2014

Rodney White Americas Hottest Artist  Move Over Andy Warhol

If you have ever watched The ABC sitcom "Freddie" and ABC's "Extreme Makeover Home Edition", you may have already viewed some of Rodney White's phenomenal art pieces. Once in a while something so unique, eye-catching and visually pleasing comes along that it just really grabs you. This is the case with the winning combination of color, rustic style, and timely messages that Rodney White has created.

One critic writes of Rodney White's work, "The most amazing aspect of this work is that it isn't created on a computer but on a canvas instead. I'm amazed by these wonderful typographical beauties. The retro feeling, grunch effect and nice color combinations make them really stand out. Most of his work contains meaningful messages. Rodney also uses different materials and techniques, mainly acrylic. Most of his paintings are on wood but some are on metallic and there is even one on a faux brick panel."

This Georgian artist, now a New Yorker residing in Brooklyn, has an ever-growing audience buying and collecting his works. His popularity soared after his national exposure on television, and the past two years have been a turning point for this self-taught artist who hails from Augusta, Georgia.

Rodney White was born in Augusta in 1976. He lived in Atlanta from 1997-2005, and then made the move to Brooklyn, New York where he works and lives. During his time in Atlanta, Rodney did attend a technical institute to study visual communications in 1999. In 2003, he had his first solo exhibition. His "Solo Exhibitions" include the following: 2005 "Future Becomings" Claret Arts: Atlanta, Georgia; 2004 "Retro Notions" Claret Arts: Atlanta, Georgia; 2004 "Recent works" Octane: Atlanta, Georgia; and 2003 " Love is..." Open Artist Studio: Atlanta, Georgia.

Since 2004 Rodney White has also accumulated quite a list of credits for "Group Exhibitions" where his work has been admired. These include the following:
2006 "Planes, Trains, and Automobiles" Anchorage Museum of History and Art: Anchorage, Alaska; 2006 "Two Person Show: Recent Works" Tag Art Gallery: Nashville, Tennessee; 2005 "Think Small Exhibition" Art 6 Gallery: Richmond, VA; 2005 Affordable Art Fair: Clapham Art Gallery (London, UK) New York, NY; 2005 "Open Gallery Show" E. Weber Gallery: Atlanta, Georgia; 2005 Decatur Arts Walk: Decatur, Georgia; 2005 Art Expo New York; 2004 Spin & Gin Fund-raiser: Atlanta, Georgia; 2004 Decatur Arts Walk: Decatur, Georgia; 2004 "Group Show: Recent Works" Iridium Gallery: Roswell, Georgia; 2004 "Open Gallery Show" Iridium Gallery: Roswell, Georgia; and 2004 "Roswell Art Walk" Taylor Kinzel Gallery: Roswell, Georgia.

Besides his group and solo exhibits, Rodney White's exposure took on national proportions with the following credits: 2005 Art World News article, April issue; 2005 Extreme Makeover Home Edition, 4 paints chosen to complete a new home; 2005 "Freddie" sitcom on ABC Rodney White image chosen for part of the permanent set design; 2005 article in Access Atlanta Exhibition Review; 2006 Extreme Makeover Home Edition, 9 pieces chosen to complete a new home; and 2006 TBS's Movie and a Makeover, original art commission for a room design.

What does Rodney think about his exposure on network TV? "There seems to be some gravitational pull between my work and the ABC network. My work was chosen to appear on Extreme Makeover Home Edition with the Crawford Smith Family. A whopping 9 pieces were hanging in the home, AND you could actually see them on television. It was a total surprise to me. My mom called while I was in the middle of painting to tell me and almost immediately after the images were shown my phones start ringing off the hook with calls from friends and family saying that they saw it and people congratulating me. It was a big deal the first time and big deal again. What was seen on the show were canvas transfers of my paintings."

If you ask Rodney what inspires him, he would say, "Everything. I see things everywhere and everyday that gives me some idea for my pieces. I love to visit flea markets and antique markets. I notice the natural aging of things around us. Billboard signs, buildings, packages, and aging paper catch my attention. I seek to replicate the rusting and decaying look of things I see."

Where did his desire to be an artist all begin? He claims that he has dabbled in art since his pre-kindergarten days. He tells the story of rushing through his class work so that he could be the first one back to the scrap paper box in the classroom. In fact, he admits that he would fill the blank pages in the front and back of encyclopedias because he thought, "Those sheets were put there for me."

When Rodney further explains his view on his own work, he shares his fascination with poetry, typography, advertising design and vintage signs. He says that by trying to encourage others to notice those things that he is, "learning, teaching, and inspiring." In describing his work and its connection to the past, he says, "The past has always been something that I've felt we could/should learn from, and advertising has always been a reflection of the desires and societal norms that are driven into the hearts and minds of consumers. Well...what if those driven desires became more positively influential on our minds and inner beings? Thus, giving us something to take into the way we live our lives, and approach the world around us."

Rodney has a love for the deterioration of things which includes objects and surfaces. He notices how things have developed and aged. He takes note of antique labels, old books and vintage posters which have that "experienced look." Because he believes that art will be around a long time, he feels the best way to leave messages behind is through art.

Rodney also says that he gets inspiration from music, other artists, poets, and literature. He enjoys music of all kinds and says, "I'm working on a slight taste for country. And that doesn't seem to be working out. It is much harder than I thought." Other artists that he admires are: Sabrina Ward Harrison, Rik Catlow, Anja Kroenke, Tim Marrs, and Ashley Wood. Among the poets he reads are Saul Williams and Sabrina Ward Harrison.

When speaking of his friends, Rodney says, "A lot of my paintings come from what I write often in my Journal/Idea books. A lot of times my friends and the people I meet say the most brilliant things and they sometimes never mean them the way I hear them. Lucky me I guess."

When asked about his interests, Rodney says, "I love furniture and dreaming up living spaces. Dcor stuff. Movies, collecting and listening 2 music. Books (Angels, Aliens, Theology) and Writing. Learning to enjoy the small things about life - like walking in the sand barefoot. Riding my bike around the city. Daily getaways listening to my iPod. (I tend to really visit new places when I do this). Talking and making...connections with people. Learning about people and their stories. Everybody has them - not everybody has someone that wants to listen to them & DREAMING...Always Dreaming."

Floyd Snyder owned and operated three framing galleries for nearly 20 years. After selling his business in the late 80s and retiring form a successful career in the stock markets he has returned to the trade he has always loved and missed. He has established his own online store representing some of finest artist in the world at http://www.framehousegallery.com He can be reached at Floyd@FrameHouseGallery.com. To see Mr. White's work go to: http://stores.ebay.com/FrameHouse-Gallery/_i.html?_nkw=rodney+white&submit=Search&_sid=51544187

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Karen Noles, A Study Of The Native American Culture Through Art

June 8th, 2014

Karen Noles, A Study Of The Native American Culture Through Art

If beauty in artwork can defined as a delightful quality intertwined with harmony of form and color and combined with craftsmanship and originality, then one need look no further than the work of Karen Noles and her artwork of Western art that revolve around Native American women and children. Though this artist is certainly capable of painting an array of subjects, her concentration over the past few years has been the feminine and domestic side of Native American Western Art. Karen has worked in pastel, gouache and, most recently, oil.

With her home located on the Flathead Indian Reservation in Montana, she works out of her home studio where she has a backdrop of more than 30,000 acres of gorgeous scenery and recreation area. She has wonderful views of the southern end of Flathead Lake and has, no doubt, been inspired by the majesty of nature in her surroundings.

Besides creating her many paintings, she touts that horseback riding is the highest on her list of interests and activities. Her work is carefully researched and is an accurate accounting of the subjects that she portrays in her paintings. She primarily focuses on "domestic life of the 1800's Native American, especially the early reservation time period," according to her biographical statements about her work.

She is a stickler for being thorough in research and data gathering. She attempts, in a very successful manner, to convey realism in her work. She has been known to spend weeks, or even months, doing research for each painting. She methodically secures reference materials and museum books to gather all that she needs to depict her scenes in an accurate and realistic form. She often travels to museums to take photos of exhibits that will help her incorporate the reality of the time into her work. In addition, her distinctive paintings are a result of attending local powwows and from drawing upon her natural surroundings.

In commenting on her work she says, "I find that not only can I try to portray a situation of that time, but I can also give honor to their works of art." This is in reference to the depictions of bead and quill work of the Early Reservation time period that she enjoys most.

To further emphasize her commitment to realism in her work, she chooses to use Native American models. In addition, she also incorporates wild animals in her photo shoots. She explains, "The children that I'm working with now I've been working with for a few years; the parents know and trust me. Children have such wonderful imagination and do such spontaneous things - some great paintings come out of it all." One only needs to look at some of her most recent works such as: "The Feather Fan", "Daughter of the Sioux"; "Blackfeet Stories"; and "Embraced In Wisdom" to understand her quote.

If you look at her work in "Tepee Tender", you will see a little girl holding a fox pup in her lap with another cuddled up next to her. Noles is able to achieve this realism with the help of a friend who works with injured or abandoned animals. Those that are tame enough to be photographed with the child models are often used. Fauns, fox pups, young lynx and bobcats are among those that have been in the photo shoots.

Among the numerous awards and distinctions for Karen Noles are the following:

The People Choice Award - C.M. Russell Art Show and Auction, Great Falls, Montana

1998 Viewers Favorite Award at the Spirit of the Great Plains Show, Museum of Nebraska Art

Honors, Pastel Society of the West Coast

Honors, New York Society of Illustrators

Patrons Choice in the Stampede Western Invitational Art Exhibit and Sale

Inspiration can be defined by something that stimulates a person to a high level of feeling, to creative thought, or to achieve the making of art. In looking at the outstanding pieces created by Karen Noles, one would have to say that she has certainly made a connection to her surroundings and interests. Fortunately, the art world is the recipient of her beautiful inspirations.

No permission is need to reprint this article as long as it remains unedited and the author's bio and links are included.

Floyd Snyder owned and operated three framing galleries for nearly 20 years. After selling his business in the late 80s and retiring form a successful career in the stock markets he has returned to the trade he has always loved and missed. He has established his own online store representing some of finest artist in the world at [http://www.FrameHouseGalleryeBay.com] He can be reached at Floyd@FrameHouseGallery.com To see Karens work go to: http://stores.ebay.com/FrameHouseGallery_Karen-Noles



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